Significant Tornado Events (8 Viewers)


warneagle

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Niles was by far the most violent tornado in Ohio history. Absolutely deserves the rating it was given, and produced much more violent damage than Xenia.
Also, speaking of other violent Ohio tornadoes, I believe that the Toledo. OH tornado of 1965 should have been rated F5. It swept away numerous anchor-bolted homes. The Pittsfield/Strongsville, OH tornado also may have produced F5 damage, though I haven't found any photographic evidence that proves this.
Given how uh, liberal some of the interpretations of F5 damage were back then, I'm really surprised none of the Palm Sunday 1965 tornadoes was rated F5. There are a few that have better cases than some other tornadoes which were rated F5.
 
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Missouri
Given how uh, liberal some of the interpretations of F5 damage were back then, I'm really surprised none of the Palm Sunday 1965 tornadoes was rated F5. There are a few that have better cases than some other tornadoes which were rated F5.
I think 2-3 were initially rated F5 but later downgraded to F4. Still quite surprising either way.
 
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317
Location
Lenexa, KS
Honestly I have a few questions to raise about all of the officially-rated F5 tornadoes in 1990. Hesston was borderline, since most of the houses swept away were not especially well-anchored, with only a couple being very well-built. I agree completely that Goessel was massively overrated.

Plainfield was an interesting case because almost all of the damage to buildings, vehicles, other structures, etc. was intense, but not exceptional...while at the same time, the crop scouring in the cornfields near the start of the path was extremely impressive, with apparently only roots left behind. It's another one of those cases where the rating really depends on whether you include vegetation damage as a DI. I haven't seen any photos of structural damage worse than low-end F4, but crop scouring that intense absolutely justifies an F5 rating imho.

I still am totally convinced that the strongest tornado of the year was the Pecos County tornado on 6/1, with the Trenton/Culbertson, NE tornado (6/15) being a close runner-up.
Not only was the scouring in Plainfield impressive, but for being only around 10 yards it threw half of a semi and a few cars great distances. The other two monsters in June of 1990 seem like good candidates for an F5 rating or EF5 rating on todays scale.
 
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213
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Missouri
The February 1971 Mississippi Delta outbreak is an overlooked event that deserves much more attention due to the significant death in predominantly rural areas with very low population density.

This tornado talk article has some additional photos and newspaper reports on the outbreak: https://www.tornadotalk.com/the-mississippi-delta-tornadoes/

This is collection of photographs of damage done by the 1971 Inverness, MS tornado during the February Delta outbreak. The majority of damage in these doesn't look to be more than high-end F3/marginal F4 at most, although I've yet to find photographs of the F5 damage reportedly done in Waverly, Louisiana by this tornado. It seems to have been particularly violent in LA, as according to Grazulis it killed 10 family members in a family of 12 and threw their bodies in a swamp and they were not located for several weeks.

I found these images here: http://www.mdah.ms.gov/arrec/digital_archives/series/mfb/browse/32/

1.jpg2.jpg3.jpg4.jpg5.jpg6.jpg7.jpg8.jpg9.jpg10.jpg
 

pohnpei

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shanghai
So, this is pretty incredible. A 3-part synced series of the Andover tornado from beginning to end. Part 2 is the most notable, as the transition of this thing from single-vortex stovepipe to multi-vortex wedge was caught on tape at multiple vantage points at the same time.

1. 2. 3.
It's really hard to find damage pics of the worst-hit areas of Andover, perhaps I can track down more photographs of F5 damage done by it another time.

While on the topic of Andover, it'd be real nice if anyone would know of any sources of damage pics caused by the Red Rock storm. That thing reminds me ALOT of El Reno 2011, as it basically had the same path length and width of that tornado.
I found two damage image from Red Rock tornado
QQ截图20200507180852.jpg
source:

QQ截图20200507181949.jpg
source:https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/1520-0493(1993)121<2200:DRWSOS>2.0.CO;2
Very useful article! The article describedd the damge above just happened before the photo below which I believe shot by B Barlow at 1852UTC which also was the point that around ~280mph(125m/s) measured by LANL portable Doppler at 150-190AGL. This article also mentioned that maybe the debris from this house bring about the previous DOW wind record thereafter.
228905_438169139558046_302494256_n.jpg
source
 
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213
Location
Missouri
This link deserves some serious attention, some wonderful photos of big-time tornadoes there. Herbert Stein was one of the great chasers (and also was a member of several research teams). RIP.
Good lord those vehicles from Andover. Certainly supports the visual intensity seen in Duke Evans' video from the golf club.
Is this the video you're talking about? I'm pretty sure that if look near the left of the screen around 4:47 you can see a mobile home airborne around the tornado.
 
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213
Location
Missouri
This footage of Niles/Wheatland always blows me away:


According to Grazulis that this was the first F5 tornado to be caught on videotape (as opposed to just old film roll cameras). I'm pretty sure this is also the first audio of an F5 tornado as well. Even more impressive is that these two firsts are of an F5 in Pennsylvania (the only F5 in Pennsylvania state history, I might add) as opposed to being in a place like Kansas, Oklahoma, or the Deep South, where violent tornadoes like this are more commonly expected.
 
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Peter Griffin

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Newport, NC
This footage of Niles/Wheatland always blows me away:


According to Grazulis that this was the first F5 tornado to be caught on videotape (as opposed to just old film roll cameras). I'm pretty sure this is also the first audio of an F5 tornado as well. Even more impressive is that these two firsts are of an F5 in Pennsylvania (the only F5 in Pennsylvania state history, I might add) as opposed to being in a place like Kansas, Oklahoma, or the Deep South, where violent tornadoes like this are more commonly expected.
Yeah that is some incredible motion on that towards the end of the video. Beastly.

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Equus

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Saragossa, AL
Whoa this thread took off this week. Awesome. Time to read.

Guin took forever to find decent damage photos of- i think it took until that video on that page was discovered. That was way back on the old TW in the "strongest Tornado Ever" thread. That was a good thread, wish it could've been archived.
Good news - that's another thread I archived, buuuut only through mid 2014.
 
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213
Location
Missouri
I'm no expert but did study soils a bit back in the 80s in forestry. It's incredibly complex and can vary dramatically over a distance of just a few feet. You also must think of the layering at depth and, of course, vegetation and the various kinds of root systems.

That said, I was fascinated by the straight lines in those pictures of gouged-out areas after a tornado passed. That kind of looks like faulting in a solid area that's under stress.

One was even sort of rectangular!

Ordinary soil doesn't do that. Most soil boundaries are irregular in shape.

Anyway, moist soil should be more cohesive than dry stuff, and less like to get picked up. That's true of normal erosion. As for the beasts under discussion . . . ?

Could these rare gouges be places where there is a hard, but shallow "pan" of some sort, with the tornado approaching at such an angle that its seismic effects stress this more solid area so that some of it fractures and gets pulled up?
The Moshannon State Forest tornado of 1985 generated tremors that were picked up by nearby seismographs. I do wonder if most violent tornadoes have the power to generate short-term earthquake-like effects on soil but it isn't very well-documented as tornadoes tend to occur in places not known for earthquakes. Powerful earthquakes can generate liquefaction of soil and that's how you can wind up with stuff like this
sandboil.jpg
after an earthquake. Perhaps tornadoes can do stuff like that (albeit at a much smaller level) to soil that allows for easier ground scouring? Interesting thought you have there. I believe Tim Samaras was working on a project on tornado-induced seismic waves but it never came to pass due to his passing away in 2013.
 
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Messages
213
Location
Missouri
So this is interesting, he is working on the updated version of Significant Tornadoes.

 

Equus

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Saragossa, AL
Last I heard Feb 2022 was the expected date for new sigtor to be ready for ordering, I really hope that stays on schedule cuz I'm definitely eager to order it.
 
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213
Location
Missouri
The best collection of damage photos of the San Justo tornado I've been able to find. Yeah, this thing was definitely an F5, and this is probably the most violent tornado damage I've seen outside of the United States.


This article is interesting when read in English translation, as apparently this was the only F5 tornado not just in South America but the entire southern hemisphere. Not sure of the accuracy of that, but interesting nonetheless:

Interesting thing on Spanish wikipedia. The first is Spanish translation of their article on "tornado corridors". Apparently South America has its own tornado alley. The second is an English translation of their article on the 1973 San Justo tornado:

1. https://translate.google.com/transl....org/wiki/Pasillo_de_los_Tornados&prev=search

2. https://translate.google.com/transl...wiki/Tornado_de_San_Justo_en_1973&prev=search

This is apparently a pic of it. No clue what the 3 circled objects in the air are, but my guess is automobiles.

san justo tornado.jpg
 
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213
Location
Missouri
Some photographs of damage done by the Moshannon State Forest tornado
:moshannon 1.jpg
moshannon 2.png
moshannon 3.png
moshannon 4.jpg

The path of this thing is still visible decades later due to the immense deforestation it did. Pretty incredible:

moshannon 7.jpg

An article on it's 30th anniversary. Seems like it did most of its damage to structures at the very beginning of its path. I am curious as to what was the DI that allowed for the F4 rating (aside from massive swaths of tree damage):

 

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