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Significant Tornado Events (4 Viewers)


Messages
260
Location
Missouri
The 1919 Fergus Falls, Minnesota tornado is another tornado that often isn't talked about as much. It did some pretty impressive damage, the most notable being a 3-story hotel that was completely leveled.

1. The Grand Hotel before the tornado.Grand Hotel 1.png

After:

Grand Hotel 2.png

The debris-filled Lake Alice:

Grand Hotel 3.png

A bunch more photographs can be found here: https://www.weather.gov/fgf/1919_06_22_FergusFallsTornado
 
Messages
260
Location
Missouri
The object in the tree is a curtain rod with the curtain still attached irrc.

Also some major grass scouring is evident in the photo third from the bottom. Never noticed until now for some reason, probably due it being in black and white.
Have you ever seen this photograph? Is it of the Brandenburg tornado or another tornado that occurred in Kentucky or Indiana on April 3, 1974?

Twister.jpg
 
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Messages
38
Location
Raleigh, NC
Found some really high quality photographs from the 1953 Flint-Beecher F5. The damage path was, or at least the core of it, was very narrow and the distance between complete destruction and things basically untouched is pretty startling.
Homes in the F5 contour:
FlintBeecherMIJune1953F5.jpeg
Note the homes essentially untouched in the background
FlintMI1953F5(3).jpeg
FlintBeecherMI53housedamage.jpeg
Some vehicles
FlintMI1953vehicel(2).jpeg
FlintMIvehicle(3).jpeg
FlintMI1953vehicle(2).jpeg
FlintBeecherMI1953vehicle.png
Can't quite tell if this is a vehicle or not. Regardless, it was mangled
FlintBeecher1953vehicle2.jpg


The photos above are taken from both the Detroit Public Library digital collection as well as from the Flint Public Library digital collection.

This link also collects the photos from the Time-Life series and it's quite extensive:
https://artsandculture.google.com/entity/1953-flint–beecher-tornado/m0ll44p9

I can remember some time ago when a lot of the photos from the Time-Life series were available online. I believe the 1955 Udall tornado was photographed extensively as a part of the series as well and those pictures, which were awesome, have disappeared off the internet. Massive bummer, honestly.
 
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Messages
38
Location
Raleigh, NC
Unfortunately, the vegetation damage the tornado caused wasn't really a focus of most photographers at the time but there are a few pictures that indicate it was on the level or worse than the other F5's recorded in the general region
FlintMI1953tree(2).jpeg
FlintMI1953treedamage.jpg
Again, note the narrow transition zone
FLintMI1953tree.jpeg

Courtesy of the Detroit Public Library digital collection and the Midland County Historical Society
 
Messages
260
Location
Missouri
Yup, that was me! I think that video was from Tornado Video Classics. It's validating to see that there are so many people interested in Pampa 1995, ha. I wonder if the Tornado Talk page was created by someone I talked to back in the day, they definitely seem to have put a lot of effort into their research.

Interesting that the Pampa event does seem to differ a little from the others. As I recall this was not necessarily a low precipitation environment and the storm definitely was capable of producing larger tornadoes, it also completely lacked a rope stage and didn't live particularly long. Of course the latter part probably has a lot to do with the formation of that exact larger tornado occurring right next to it.
The more I think about it, I'm not sure I'd classify Pampa as a 'drillbit' tornado as its circulation was way wider than the narrow funnel you see on tapes, due to the vast amounts of debris whirling around it, it was more an instance of the tornado's core being visible which doesn't happen all that often. Really makes me wonder what would have been filmed if Smithville, Hackleburg or various other EF5 tornadoes of today had widely visible cores...
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
561
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Have you ever seen this photograph? Is it of the Brandenburg tornado or another tornado that occurred in Kentucky or Indiana on April 3, 1974?

View attachment 4274
I have seen this pic and it’s a bit of a mystery. Some suggest that it was the Louisville tornado, but confirmed photos and videos of that tornado show a narrower, more wispy-looking tornado. However, eyewitnesses to the Brandenburg tornado described it as a large gray cylinder. The above photo looks more consistent with that description. If I had to make an educated guess, I’d say that this photo is of the Brandenburg tornado. Far from positive on that though.
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
561
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Sorry to go back to old topics but New Richmond and Fergus Falls were extremely violent tornadoes, and were likely the most intense ever documented in each of the respective states they occurred in.

New Richmond almost entirely swept away a large residential area of town (a previous poster already showed pictures of this), carried a safe weighing over 1 ton a full block, and leveled/partially swept away a large multi-story hotel.

Fergus Falls may have been even more violent. It completely debarked trees, swept away a train station, and even ripped railroad tracks from the ground at one location. That is VERY impressive. In addition, large and well-built homes were swept completely away in residential areas of town, with the the ground being pretty much swept clean of debris. Such a clean sweep in such a densely populated area is pretty remarkable. This is visible in the background of the panorama below, though you have to enlarge it to see. It's easy to miss because of the lack of debris, but check out the large the completely wiped clean foundations where large homes once were.


Oh and Flint was pretty monstrous too. Maybe not quite as impressive as the other two mentioned above due to all the photos showing poor foundation construction, but again, very impressive given the population/building density.
 
Messages
260
Location
Missouri
I have seen this pic and it’s a bit of a mystery. Some suggest that it was the Louisville tornado, but confirmed photos and videos of that tornado show a narrower, more wispy-looking tornado. However, eyewitnesses to the Brandenburg tornado described it as a large gray cylinder. The above photo looks more consistent with that description. If I had to make an educated guess, I’d say that this photo is of the Brandenburg tornado. Far from positive on that though.
I saw an FB page proclaiming it to be the Kennard, IN tornado but I doubt it, I think it's of Brandenburg due to the hilly topography, as Indiana is much more flat. On the other hand, I thought Brandenburg was rain-wrapped for much of its path, but maybe I read wrong.
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
561
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Looks like there was a significant tornado in Mongolia yesterday. 30 injuries, including 3 critical. Again showing that China is likely much more active tornado wise than previously though. I would love to hear from some of our posters in China if they have any info about this event!
 
Messages
260
Location
Missouri
Found some really high quality photographs from the 1953 Flint-Beecher F5. The damage path was, or at least the core of it, was very narrow and the distance between complete destruction and things basically untouched is pretty startling.
Homes in the F5 contour:
View attachment 4259
Note the homes essentially untouched in the background
View attachment 4260
View attachment 4263
Some vehicles
View attachment 4261
View attachment 4262
View attachment 4275
View attachment 4265
Can't quite tell if this is a vehicle or not. Regardless, it was mangled
View attachment 4266


The photos above are taken from both the Detroit Public Library digital collection as well as from the Flint Public Library digital collection.

This link also collects the photos from the Time-Life series and it's quite extensive:
https://artsandculture.google.com/entity/1953-flint–beecher-tornado/m0ll44p9

I can remember some time ago when a lot of the photos from the Time-Life series were available online. I believe the 1955 Udall tornado was photographed extensively as a part of the series as well and those pictures, which were awesome, have disappeared off the internet. Massive bummer, honestly.
Some more pics from Flint:

These first two show that low-lying shrubs were completely stripped:

Flint 1.png
Flint 2.jpg

This next one is an aerial of the devastation, every single one of the 40 homes was swept completely clean:

Flint 3.png

Another aerial demonstrating that the tornado had a complex multivortex structure:

Flint 4.png

This demonstrates the extraordinary intense core of the damage path:

Flint 5.jpg

A video of aftermath footage from Flint, contains a huge amount of wrecked and mangled cars:
I found all these pics from stormstalker, which provide an excellent write up of the 1953 outbreak in America, the deadliest post-radar until 2011: https://stormstalker.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/flint-worcester-outbreak/
The admin of this site used to post under the name 'locomusic01' not sure if he's still around anymore or not.
 
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buckeye05

Member
Messages
561
Location
Riverside, Ohio
I saw an FB page proclaiming it to be the Kennard, IN tornado but I doubt it, I think it's of Brandenburg due to the hilly topography, as Indiana is much more flat. On the other hand, I thought Brandenburg was rain-wrapped for much of its path, but maybe I read wrong.
You know honestly it could be Kennard. There is a photo of the Kennard tornado in Significant Tornadoes, and it doesn't look too far off from this. Southern Indiana is actually quite hilly as well.

Also yeah, Brandenburg was rain-wrapped at times, but was also visible at times as well from what I understand.
 
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