Significant Tornado Events (6 Viewers)


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Even meteorologists can't give an proper explanation I guess,there are too many mysteries in tornado and I just list one of them.And some new examples pop from my head like the Dodge city tornado family also perfectly fits the law.
Well it's like in that Chuck Doswell paper, it's all part of a spectrum of convective vortices in the atmosphere; physical processes just happen and we attempt to label them arbitrarily in an attempt to understand them.
 
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YT_candidate

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I'd seen the photos of the "splitting" phenomenon from Chuck Doswell's 1995 chase logs (archived here) but hadn't read further into the discussion of it. But yes, that's another thing that makes Pampa a little different.

In this case though, the formation of Hoover actually seemed to negatively affect the intensity of the Pampa tornado in dramatic fashion - from Doswell's notes, the Pampa circulation appeared to be at its maximum strength at the peak of its mature stage (approx 7:00 in the Stubblefield's video) and then almost immediately shrank and lifted in the span of 1-2 minutes as the Hoover funnel cloud began to form. I can only assume that the storm chaser who'd said they coexisted for 6 minutes had misremembered things since their photos show Hoover didn't touch down until Pampa had largely dissipated. This process occurred as Pampa crossed Price Rd and started to track into the residential areas where the damage was much less intense. In this case I think we might've seen much more of Pampa - including possibly a photogenic rope stage as seen with Elie, Wilkin, and Dalton - had it not been for the Hoover system.

On another note, there's also some aerial footage taken of the Dalton track:


The ground scouring definitely looks more moderate than Wilkin which had pretty much dug a massive scar into the Earth, still more than Elie of course.

Speaking of Elie, I should correct my mistake - upon review the track it appears the tornado actually did cross over a part of its previous path, although this intersection hadn't occurred in the neighborhood. The slow speed almost certainly did contribute to the damage though, I would suspect the dense areas of near-total debarking probably had something to do with the debris shredding mentioned.
 
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eric11

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The saying"they coexisted for six minutes"can be found in this post http://www.okweatherwatch.com/StormObservation/texas-panhandle-tornadoes-june-8-1995/
Since he witnessed the entire life cycle of pampa and hoover,so his word may be dependable.There was no video documented how pampa died or hoover formed(One video I remember captured hoover touched town,missed a farm from rather close range).So maybe pampa lifted and then reached back to ground again briefly like the DDC2,who knows.
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Wilkin did one of the most intense ground scouring mark in Northern Plains as far as I can remember.I agree your opinion on Dalton's ground scar was moderate than Wilkin,but it still looks impressive
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Dalton's car damage is another one that has to be mentioned,various type of cars thrown,mangled beyond recognition,including some really big semitrailer which weighs several tons I guess.Only one drillbit tornado can match this level of car damage,pampa.
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buckeye05

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Does anyone have any of the damage photos from Wilkin/Tyler 2010 that show chunks of concrete ripped from the foundation of a barn that was obliterated? I remember it distinctly, but can no longer find them. They were scattered into a heavily scoured field, and it was very impressive. Probably the most impressive instance of damage from that tornado. This shows evidence of remarkably intense low-level winds.
 

YT_candidate

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Doswell's chase logs do have a few pictures of Pampa's demise, with the Hoover funnel cloud in the background:



You can also see Pampa begin to lift at the end of Sheriff Stubblefield's video. This is basically what was represented in the 2nd photo from the OKweather blog.

Since at this point Pampa was around ~10 minutes into its 11 minute lifespan, and the mapped path of the tornado shows Pampa didn't get far into the residential area after crossing Price Road as Hoover started to coalesce, I think the 6 minute quote was just an error of memory.

Interesting aftermath photos from Dalton, had not seen those before. I will say that Mulvane's automobile damage was more impressive than I anticipated. While likely underrated I didn't remember Mulvane as being as visually impressive as some of these other tornadoes, but those cars definitely meet the definition of "mangled beyond recognition"...like some of the other drill bits on the list, Mulvane also had a spectacular shrinking/rope stage where it attained its highest wind speeds, although it seems to differ in that it didn't appear to reach violent class intensity before its shrinking stage.

Since Dalton's highest wind speeds seemed to occur closer to the end of its life, a possibility is that its ground scouring appears less prominent than Wilkin's because it was most intense when the tornado was thinner - though I'm not sure the aerial views really bear this out. But yes, undoubtedly still impressive. It would seem to me that the scour patterns from these smaller tornadoes are not necessarily far narrower than those of most violent wedges, for the most part; this seems consistent with the observation that only a small core in most such monsters is doing the worst damage (subvortices notwithstanding) whereas pretty much the entire condensation funnel of a drill bit is core. It also makes Jarrell all that much more of an anomaly.

Someday I think I am going to have to look for pictures of scouring from Pampa. A newspaper clipping mentioned that the tornado drained 10-12 ft of water from a dammed pond, coupled with what are perhaps the highest vertical wind speeds seen in any tornado to date I would think Pampa would have been more than capable. The lack of imagery is indeed quite unfortunate.

Now, as for an event that's less remarkable in terms of strength, here's Dallas/Lancaster from 2012:


Probably most well known by the public for being caught on tape lifting tractor trailors, and most well known by myself for striking pretty close to home. This footage displays an interesting transition where what had previously been a stubby medium sized stovepipe disappears and then reorganizes into an elephant trunk before restrengthening. Perhaps not uncommon, but what I don't know is whether it was entering its shrinking stage, or whether this was a "secondary" mature stage, like a reverse Andover if you will.

Does anyone have any of the damage photos from Wilkin/Tyler 2010 that show chunks of concrete ripped from the foundation of a barn that was obliterated? I remember it distinctly, but can no longer find them. They were scattered into a heavily scoured field, and it was very impressive. Probably the most impressive instance of damage from that tornado. This shows evidence of remarkably intense low-level winds.
That is indeed fascinating, I don't think I'd remembered it myself. Though they probably comprise a relatively small percentage of violent tornadoes (or, at least, violent tornadoes that were actually rated as such), drill bits certainly do seem to be responsible for quite some amount of interesting phenomena.
 
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eric11

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Does anyone have any of the damage photos from Wilkin/Tyler 2010 that show chunks of concrete ripped from the foundation of a barn that was obliterated? I remember it distinctly, but can no longer find them. They were scattered into a heavily scoured field, and it was very impressive. Probably the most impressive instance of damage from that tornado. This shows evidence of remarkably intense low-level winds.
I'm not sure whether you're refering to this one
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eric11

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I found a new drone footage posted 5 days ago about Dalton EF4 which contains much more information than other drone footage
The place where the tornado first reached its peak intensity.Not only does the ground scouring stand out,but also the tornado sucked water and other things out from the pond as it left a "flooded scar" at the right of the pond.
IMG_20200726_024655.jpg
This picture captured when the tornado moved into the pond as the debris cloud turned from dark to white
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Another view at ground level watching the tornado moving into the pond
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The tornado then weakened significantly since only minor vegatation or tree damage can be found.Tornado weakened and strengthened several times as it moved over open water and woods.A rapid intensification took place when tornado reached this point.As you can see,a much cleaner,narrower area lied in the center of the ground scar which I believe this path,maybe only several yards wide,is the centerline of the tornado.The same characteristic can be found in bassfield nears its peak intensity in hardwood forests area.
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The width shrinked significantly at this point.You can also found water was sucking out of the pond and "wind rowed"to the opposite of tornado's moving direction.
IMG_20200726_024938.jpg
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The famous up close video filmed right here
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I'll take my words back cuz now it seems just as strong as wilkin even stronger judging from the ground scouring.
 

YT_candidate

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I'll take my words back cuz now it seems just as strong as wilkin even stronger judging from the ground scouring.
I would be inclined to agree, that central cutting line is something else. It appears I may have been incorrect about the highest wind speeds being achieved during the shrinking stage, as it seems the most drastic scouring appears to have occurred where the tornado was widest. Think I may have to review the footage of the tornado's lifespan again.
 

eric11

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I would be inclined to agree, that central cutting line is something else. It appears I may have been incorrect about the highest wind speeds being achieved during the shrinking stage, as it seems the most drastic scouring appears to have occurred where the tornado was widest. Think I may have to review the footage of the tornado's lifespan again.
Yes, considering the contextual and car damage,It did peaked at its widest point and shortly after that it hit the machine shop,threw various vehicles and caused one fatality
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I cannot be sure whether it achieved the same intensity again cuz It soon got so narrower that nothing was touched except the ground and corn.It's really hard to judge what level it reached but I'd say at least Wilkin level.
Speaking of central cutting line,I thought only some high end violent tornadoes are capable of doing that.I haven't seen an obvious central cutting line left in Wilkin or Elie.
 

eric11

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Though It's already been 25 years ago,Kellerville TX F4(5) definitely had some best documentation at that time
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The ground scouring
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[
Though It's already been 25 years ago,Kellerville TX F4(5) definitely had some best documentation at that time
View attachment 4165
View attachment 4166
View attachment 4167
View attachment 4168
View attachment 4163View attachment 4164
The ground scouring
View attachment 4169
I'd love to find more damage photos from this thing, especially the house that was supposedly so obliterated the survey team likely missed it (assuming that's not a myth of some sort). Also, what's up with the wobbly core of this thing?
 

eric11

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[

I'd love to find more damage photos from this thing, especially the house that was supposedly so obliterated the survey team likely missed it (assuming that's not a myth of some sort). Also, what's up with the wobbly core of this thing?
The missing house is a rumour,It has already been clarified by stormtrack users.
Kellerville touched down and quickly grew into a big wedge not long after the first picture was taken.As it was intensifying, a new meso to its east dropped down another weak F1.Kellerville interacted with the new tornado and weakened a little bit but violent rotation could still be seen on the video,it ate the new meso and restrengthend to a cone tornado with a big debris cloud looks like moore.The new meso can be seen in the right of the picture.
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eric11

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Yeah this was the barn. Unfortunately you can’t see the concrete pieces here though. They were scattered towards the horizon through that path of scouring you can see in the background. I wish NWS Grand Forks didn’t get rid of the pics.
I reviewed the aerial footage,this slab may be the barn.other slabs can be found around the barn,I really hope Grand Forks could release Wilkin's damage photos
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eric11

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Doswell's chase logs do have a few pictures of Pampa's demise, with the Hoover funnel cloud in the background:



You can also see Pampa begin to lift at the end of Sheriff Stubblefield's video. This is basically what was represented in the 2nd photo from the OKweather blog.

Since at this point Pampa was around ~10 minutes into its 11 minute lifespan, and the mapped path of the tornado shows Pampa didn't get far into the residential area after crossing Price Road as Hoover started to coalesce, I think the 6 minute quote was just an error of memory.

Interesting aftermath photos from Dalton, had not seen those before. I will say that Mulvane's automobile damage was more impressive than I anticipated. While likely underrated I didn't remember Mulvane as being as visually impressive as some of these other tornadoes, but those cars definitely meet the definition of "mangled beyond recognition"...like some of the other drill bits on the list, Mulvane also had a spectacular shrinking/rope stage where it attained its highest wind speeds, although it seems to differ in that it didn't appear to reach violent class intensity before its shrinking stage.

Since Dalton's highest wind speeds seemed to occur closer to the end of its life, a possibility is that its ground scouring appears less prominent than Wilkin's because it was most intense when the tornado was thinner - though I'm not sure the aerial views really bear this out. But yes, undoubtedly still impressive. It would seem to me that the scour patterns from these smaller tornadoes are not necessarily far narrower than those of most violent wedges, for the most part; this seems consistent with the observation that only a small core in most such monsters is doing the worst damage (subvortices notwithstanding) whereas pretty much the entire condensation funnel of a drill bit is core. It also makes Jarrell all that much more of an anomaly.

Someday I think I am going to have to look for pictures of scouring from Pampa. A newspaper clipping mentioned that the tornado drained 10-12 ft of water from a dammed pond, coupled with what are perhaps the highest vertical wind speeds seen in any tornado to date I would think Pampa would have been more than capable. The lack of imagery is indeed quite unfortunate.

Now, as for an event that's less remarkable in terms of strength, here's Dallas/Lancaster from 2012:


Probably most well known by the public for being caught on tape lifting tractor trailors, and most well known by myself for striking pretty close to home. This footage displays an interesting transition where what had previously been a stubby medium sized stovepipe disappears and then reorganizes into an elephant trunk before restrengthening. Perhaps not uncommon, but what I don't know is whether it was entering its shrinking stage, or whether this was a "secondary" mature stage, like a reverse Andover if you will.

That is indeed fascinating, I don't think I'd remembered it myself. Though they probably comprise a relatively small percentage of violent tornadoes (or, at least, violent tornadoes that were actually rated as such), drill bits certainly do seem to be responsible for quite some amount of interesting phenomena.
I knew little about lancaster TX tornado,This video really attracts me as it shows two appearance occurred in a short time,especially a violent rotating tight wedge converted into a cone is something rare, I can hardly find out another events that has the same developing process with this one.However,I did remember some similar events
Like the Last chance,CO tornado on 7/21/1993.The tornado had a great full life span documentation here http://stormbruiser.com/chase/1993/07/21/july-21-1993-last-chance-colorado-tornado/
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Another case was the Quinter KS tornado on 5/23/2008.
This video had some good recording
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IMG_20200728_025639.jpg
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Raleigh, NC
With the hurricane season's peak ahead of us, I thought it would be interesting to do a little illustrative write-up on the most destructive and perhaps most intense tornado ever spawned by an Atlantic hurricane. The history of violent, hurricane-spawned tornadoes is quite short- one in Galveston during Hurricane Carla(1961) and again three years later in Larose, LA during Hurricane Hilda(1964). I'll be focusing on the latter.

Larose was a small fishing village situated along the Bayou LaFourche about 70 miles to the south of New Orleans. The town's population, 50-100 normally, had risen by several hundred as evacuees moved inland to avoid the wrath of Hilda. Several other tornadoes touched down in the area the morning hours of October 3rd, arriving a full 12 hours or so before Hilda's landfall along the Louisiana coastline. There were two F2's and two F0's. The most noteworthy of these was an F2 that injured five while cutting a path through New Orleans' French Quarter at about 9am. The Larose storm touched down around 6:30 in the morning and most likely stayed on the ground for only a few minutes before lifting. The damage path was described as 50 yards wide and two miles long through Larose with the most intense damage occurring along the Bayou LaFourche. Brick frame homes were leveled(difficult to ascertain degree of anchoring), vehicles were tossed considerable distance, and twenty-two people perished in a two mile stretch.
Aerial Shots
LaroseLAOct63aerialview.jpg
LaroseLAOct63aerial2.jpg
Home damage(construction dubious)
LaroseLAOctober63.jpg
LaroseLAOct63F4(4).jpg
Vehicle damage and general debris field
LaroseLAOct63F4(2).jpg
LaroseLAOct63vehicle.jpg
LaroseLAOct63debris2.jpg

Based on what I've seen, the Larose storm is probably the most violent tropically spawned tornado to be reliably documented. The Galveston F4 seems to be a notch below.
 
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With the hurricane season's peak ahead of us, I thought it would be interesting to do a little illustrative write-up on the most destructive and perhaps most intense tornado ever spawned by an Atlantic hurricane. The history of violent, hurricane-spawned tornadoes is quite short- one in Galveston during Hurricane Carla(1961) and again three years later in Larose, LA during Hurricane Hilda(1964). I'll be focusing on the latter.

Larose was a small fishing village situated along the Bayou LaFourche about 70 miles to the south of New Orleans. The town's population, 50-100 normally, had risen by several hundred as evacuees moved inland to avoid the wrath of Hilda. Several other tornadoes touched down in the area the morning hours of October 3rd, arriving a full 12 hours or so before Hilda's landfall along the Louisiana coastline. There were two F2's and two F0's. The most noteworthy of these was an F2 that injured five while cutting a path through New Orleans' French Quarter at about 9am. The Larose storm touched down around 6:30 in the morning and most likely stayed on the ground for only a few minutes before lifting. The damage path was described as 50 yards wide and two miles long through Larose with the most intense damage occurring along the Bayou LaFourche. Brick frame homes were leveled(difficult to ascertain degree of anchoring), vehicles were tossed considerable distance, and twenty-two people perished in a two mile stretch.
Aerial Shots
View attachment 4181
View attachment 4182
Home damage(construction dubious)
View attachment 4183
View attachment 4184
Vehicle damage and general debris field
View attachment 4185
View attachment 4186
View attachment 4187

Based on what I've seen, the Larose storm is probably the most violent tropically spawned tornado to be reliably documented. The Galveston F4 seems to be a notch below.
Incredible that 22 people were killed in the space of only 2 miles and likely a few minutes, I've head about this thing before and I do wish there were more high-quality photographs of its damage available; I can't help but wonder if this thing achieved F5 intensity but the construction material of the buildings it struck was likely dubious at best, so they couldn't go any higher than F4 with ranking it.
 

buckeye05

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With the hurricane season's peak ahead of us, I thought it would be interesting to do a little illustrative write-up on the most destructive and perhaps most intense tornado ever spawned by an Atlantic hurricane. The history of violent, hurricane-spawned tornadoes is quite short- one in Galveston during Hurricane Carla(1961) and again three years later in Larose, LA during Hurricane Hilda(1964). I'll be focusing on the latter.

Larose was a small fishing village situated along the Bayou LaFourche about 70 miles to the south of New Orleans. The town's population, 50-100 normally, had risen by several hundred as evacuees moved inland to avoid the wrath of Hilda. Several other tornadoes touched down in the area the morning hours of October 3rd, arriving a full 12 hours or so before Hilda's landfall along the Louisiana coastline. There were two F2's and two F0's. The most noteworthy of these was an F2 that injured five while cutting a path through New Orleans' French Quarter at about 9am. The Larose storm touched down around 6:30 in the morning and most likely stayed on the ground for only a few minutes before lifting. The damage path was described as 50 yards wide and two miles long through Larose with the most intense damage occurring along the Bayou LaFourche. Brick frame homes were leveled(difficult to ascertain degree of anchoring), vehicles were tossed considerable distance, and twenty-two people perished in a two mile stretch.
Aerial Shots
View attachment 4181
View attachment 4182
Home damage(construction dubious)
View attachment 4183
View attachment 4184
Vehicle damage and general debris field
View attachment 4185
View attachment 4186
View attachment 4187

Based on what I've seen, the Larose storm is probably the most violent tropically spawned tornado to be reliably documented. The Galveston F4 seems to be a notch below.
A death toll that high from such a brief tornado suggests that it was likely genuinely violent. That’s extremely impressive, and not to mention tragic.
 

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