locomusic01

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Another Palm Sunday 1965 tornado that I’m curious about is the Allen County/Lima, OH F4. The descriptions of the damage from Grazulis and newspapers sounds very intense, with reports of “explosive” destruction of homes, with debris from obliterated houses scattered long distances through fields. Cars were also reportedly thrown and “ripped apart.” It remained in rural areas and only struck farms, but still killed 13 people.
A few years ago a local discovered a "lost" 8mm home video shot around the Bluffton area, where most of the deaths occurred. It's really fantastic:


I think I've also got some photos - I'll check and post a bit later.
 

TH2002

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Another tornado I've been meaning to dig into further eventually is the 4/17/1963 Kankakee, IL F4. Grazulis describes "near-F5" damage in some areas; I haven't had time to try and find that yet, but it's a personal favorite of mine just because the event featured some really stunning photos of the tornado itself.

Taken as it was passing through Bourbonnais:



And near Momence:



Taken from Kankakee High School:



Taken by a woman from her back porch near Bonfield:



And a whole sequence (taken ~1 min apart IIRC) from around the Bourbonnais area:



And some assorted damage shots:





These are from the area around Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, including "Trailerville" - a trailer park set up for married college students:









And these are from around the Gifford, IN area near the end of the track:

















The main reason Kankakee interests me is because the tornado was filmed from multiple angles at multiple points throughout its life which wasn't all that common in 1963. At one point it had an appearance strikingly similar to Fridley '86:
 

MNTornadoGuy

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One underrated tornado of the 2000s is the 2007 Deland/Lake Mack FL EF3. Mobile homes were completely obliterated with frames being bent around trees, the lakeside was scoured, and trees were shredded/debarked. 13 people were killed by this tornado making it one of the deadliest tornadoes in FL history.
Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-36_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-25_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-15_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-06_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-02-57_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-05-50_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

jannet-walsh02032007lakemactornados.jpg

 

buckeye05

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One underrated tornado of the 2000s is the 2007 Deland/Lake Mack FL EF3. Mobile homes were completely obliterated with frames being bent around trees, the lakeside was scoured, and trees were shredded/debarked. 13 people were killed by this tornado making it one of the deadliest tornadoes in FL history.
Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-36_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-25_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-15_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-03-06_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-02-57_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

Screenshot_2021-09-11_at_14-05-50_020207_lakemack_pdf.png

jannet-walsh02032007lakemactornados.jpg

Yeah there’s a presentation by Jim LaDue on YouTube where he insinuates that if this one happened today, he likely would have gone with EF4 based on the tree damage. There were hardwoods that were stripped of all limbs and most bark along the path!
 

andyhb

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The Kissimmee tornado from 2/23/1998 is another that probably deserved an F4 rating, unlike perhaps the two tornadoes in FL history that are actually rated F4...
 

TH2002

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Yakutsk, Russia is certainly most well known for being the coldest inhabited large city on Earth. Contrary to popular belief, however, Yakutsk does have actual seasons and severe weather is not unheard of. This video, while very poor quality, does appear to show a genuine landspout tornado:
 
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Yakutsk, Russia is certainly most well known for being the coldest inhabited large city on Earth. Contrary to popular belief, however, Yakutsk does have actual seasons and severe weather is not unheard of. This video, while very poor quality, does appear to show a genuine landspout tornado:
I wonder how many times stuff like this has occurred this far north and has simply never been recorded by any human; a massive violent wedge could go through a large section of Siberian forest or wide frozen plain and unless it was caught on radar or a random person's phone/camera will never be mentioned or heard of.
 

buckeye05

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Found some pics that I've never seen before of the Marion ND F4 tornado from 7/18/2004 on Facebook posted by Lindsey Hansen.

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This one not only should have been rated F5, but it may very well have been the most violent documented tornado in North Dakota state history based on the damage it produced.

More impressive than Fargo imo, and Fort Rice wasn’t even close to either.
 
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This one not only should have been rated F5, but it may very well have been the most violent documented tornado in North Dakota state history based on the damage it produced.

More impressive than Fargo imo, and Fort Rice wasn’t even close to either.
Of note the ground scouring from this thing was around 700 yards wide, only Jarrell was wider (at 800 yards or so), at least according to the Tornado Talk article (that is now behind a paywall but once upon a time was free). One of the surveyors wishes they could have gone back and rated it F5, I have a feeling being in 2004 at the height of the whole La Plata deal likely was a factor in this thing being labeled F4 instead of F5.
 

TH2002

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I wonder how many times stuff like this has occurred this far north and has simply never been recorded by any human; a massive violent wedge could go through a large section of Siberian forest or wide frozen plain and unless it was caught on radar or a random person's phone/camera will never be mentioned or heard of.
What's extremely interesting to me is this 1913 log from a crewmember on the SY Aurora, which was on an Antarctic expedition at the time:

"The wind blows in gusts. One time you will see the smoke going straight up from the funnel for about five or ten minutes, then a gust will come across picking the water up in its course and whirling it round and round like a waterspout, high up in the air, as far as you can see. It minded me of the water spouts I see across the Northern Atlantic Ocean, only there is not so much water in them. The spouts on the Western Ocean are solid water, and these are only sprays being whirled around."

Here is the source: https://antarcticdiary.wordpress.com/part-4/
 

MNTornadoGuy

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What's extremely interesting to me is this 1913 log from a crewmember on the SY Aurora, which was on an Antarctic expedition at the time:

"The wind blows in gusts. One time you will see the smoke going straight up from the funnel for about five or ten minutes, then a gust will come across picking the water up in its course and whirling it round and round like a waterspout, high up in the air, as far as you can see. It minded me of the water spouts I see across the Northern Atlantic Ocean, only there is not so much water in them. The spouts on the Western Ocean are solid water, and these are only sprays being whirled around."

Here is the source: https://antarcticdiary.wordpress.com/part-4/
Sounds like these might just be eddies.
 

locomusic01

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This one not only should have been rated F5, but it may very well have been the most violent documented tornado in North Dakota state history based on the damage it produced.

More impressive than Fargo imo, and Fort Rice wasn’t even close to either.
Speaking of North Dakota, one tornado I was surprised to see that we haven't mentioned in this thread is the 8/20/1911 Antler, ND F4. It killed at least seven people in total (two in Lyleton, Manitoba), narrowly missing Antler itself as it curved northward but striking a picnic area instead. Officially it killed two people there, but I've also seen reports listing four or five. At least one of the people killed was thrown more than a quarter-mile, and in the same area the "soil was plowed up." A nearby field was also scoured of grain such that "not a sheaf is visible anywhere on the farm."

A number of "fine" farmhouses were "literally torn to splinters," and heavy farm machinery was reportedly carried for miles (probably not quite that far in reality). The tornado was also well-photographed as it passed the outskirts of town.























 

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