locomusic01

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Yeah the Coldwater tornadoes produced some of the most violent damage in Michigan history imo.

Honestly, I feel like the only reason Palm Sunday isn’t really considered a “super” outbreak is due to a lack of F5 ratings, despite multiple tornadoes that produced obvious F5 damage. There were also probably numerous F0s and F1s that were never confirmed, and the total number of tornadoes that occurred that day is almost certainly higher that what is documented. It was by all indications on par with, or at least close to a 4/3/1974 or 4/27/2011 type of event.
Pretty good case to be made that both the 1920 and 1965 Palm Sunday outbreaks should be considered super outbreaks, especially if you account for the low-balling of the official numbers with older events. Palm Sunday '65 officially has the second-most violent tornadoes (18) of any outbreak, of course. Palm Sunday '20 officially has "only" eight violent, but at least four others caused damage that probably could (should?) have been rated as violent, and several of the official F4s were actually families of multiple violent tornadoes. Not to mention the geographical extent of the outbreak, with violent tornadoes occurring as far north as the Tri-Cities area of Michigan and as far south as Central Alabama.
 
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Pretty good case to be made that both the 1920 and 1965 Palm Sunday outbreaks should be considered super outbreaks, especially if you account for the low-balling of the official numbers with older events. Palm Sunday '65 officially has the second-most violent tornadoes (18) of any outbreak, of course. Palm Sunday '20 officially has "only" eight violent, but at least four others caused damage that probably could (should?) have been rated as violent, and several of the official F4s were actually families of multiple violent tornadoes. Not to mention the geographical extent of the outbreak, with violent tornadoes occurring as far north as the Tri-Cities area of Michigan and as far south as Central Alabama.
I think 1965 could be considered a Super Outbreak on a smaller scale, or 4/27/11 shifted further north.
 

locomusic01

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I think 1965 could be considered a Super Outbreak on a smaller scale, or 4/27/11 shifted further north.
Honestly, even spatially it was a lot bigger than I think most people realize. Violent tornadoes spanned from Eastern Iowa to Cleveland and from Central Michigan to Central Indiana, which IIRC is something like 500 miles west-east and 200 miles north-south.
 
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Honestly, even spatially it was a lot bigger than I think most people realize. Violent tornadoes spanned from Eastern Iowa to Cleveland and from Central Michigan to Central Indiana, which IIRC is something like 500 miles west-east and 200 miles north-south.
The jet stream was like 140 kts in some places and some of the tornadoes were moving up to 75 mph....very far outbreaks before and after have had tornadoes clocking it across the ground like that.
 

MNTornadoGuy

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Honestly, even spatially it was a lot bigger than I think most people realize. Violent tornadoes spanned from Eastern Iowa to Cleveland and from Central Michigan to Central Indiana, which IIRC is something like 500 miles west-east and 200 miles north-south.
There were also violent & intense tornadoes in Arkansas and Kansas the day before the Palm Sunday outbreak.
 
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TH2002

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Rare photos from the Coldwater tornado showing the Devils Lake Pavilion

What the building looked like before:
a003%5E1964%20shot%20from%20dan%20cherry.JPG


...and after. The poor guy had just rebuilt the building after it had burned in a fire in 1963.
a002%5Epalm%20sunday%20tornado%20damage%201965%20from%20dan%20cherry.JPG
 

locomusic01

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One more random event for tonight - the March 2, 1906 F4 that struck Meridian, MS. The official death toll was 23, though some accounts put it at nearly twice that. Unfortunately, most of the photos were taken around the Union Station area, which isn't where the very worst damage occurred.

























 

buckeye05

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Damage from the Sayler Park OH F5. I just wanted to share some photos I found from some of the lesser-known or more obscure violent tornadoes of the 1974 Super Outbreak. Also, I think I might have found photos showing the F5 damage.
56514037_10214860691735581_5653343861200650240_n.jpg
I’ve never seen any of these. The F5 damage in Sayler Park allegedly occurred where several homes were swept away in a “hilly area near a lake”. Can’t say I’ve seen any photos that match that description, but there’s definitely some impressive damage in those photos above.
 

andyhb

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As a whole, the 1942 season is generally overlooked. Was definitely one of the most prolific in the pre-1950 era.
 

TH2002

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I'm sure Oak Grove 1998 has been discussed in this thread before, but does anyone know why it got an F5 rating? Unless there's something I haven't seen, all of the homes pictured swept away were obviously poorly anchored and the damage to Oak Grove High School could be attributed to a tornado of F4 intensity IMO.
 

buckeye05

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I'm sure Oak Grove 1998 has been discussed in this thread before, but does anyone know why it got an F5 rating? Unless there's something I haven't seen, all of the homes pictured swept away were obviously poorly anchored and the damage to Oak Grove High School could be attributed to a tornado of F4 intensity IMO.
Your assessment is accurate. It would have been rated EF4 today, and probably should have been rated F4 back then. I do remember that someone on the old forum mentioned that the 1998 Bham tornado dislodged and swept away a segment of concrete walkway/sidewalk leading to the front door of one obliterated home (kind of like Rochelle/Fairdale 2015 did), though I haven’t heard any other mention of that, nor any photographic evidence, so I have to write it off as a rumor.
 
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Your assessment is accurate. It would have been rated EF4 today, and probably should have been rated F4 back then. I do remember that someone on the old forum mentioned that the 1998 Bham tornado dislodged and swept away a segment of concrete walkway/sidewalk leading to the front door of one obliterated home (kind of like Rochelle/Fairdale 2015 did), though I haven’t heard any other mention of that, nor any photographic evidence, so I have to write it off as a rumor.
I don't think we've posted any damage photographs from this tornado on here before....all the photos I've seen suggest nothing more then mid-range F4, the damage is violent but not incredible or exceptional. NWS Birmingham is one of the better rating agencies but every so often they make mistakes.
 

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