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Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Besides the ABC 33/40 video, I managed to find an aerial of Guin below
View attachment 4923
That Guin aerial photo is interesting....looks like a narrow swath of damage in the upper part of the picture and selective damage throughout the downtown area...there's a PDF of the book 'A Night to Remember' by Charles Jordan that used to be available on NOAA and it has some more B&W damage pics from Guin but nothing in particular stuck out to me. I have the PDF on my computer but it's too large to upload to the forums here. I have some pics posted from it on page 42 of this forum, some are pretty impressive but nothing strikes me as 'F6'.
Also, this Murphysboro aerial is pretty impressive, right next to the railroad it looks like an entire neighborhood has been swept away.
19250318MURPHYSBORO11.jpg

Also, this pic right here:

19250318CROSSVILLE.PNG

Is this an aerial of a house from the air? Not quite sure what I'm looking at, apparently it was in White County, near Crossville, IL? I'm still not quite sure where the house ends and the foliage begins
 
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Oakhurst_Wx

Member
Messages
5
Location
Mars
That Guin aerial photo is interesting....looks like a narrow swath of damage in the upper part of the picture and selective damage throughout the downtown area...there's a PDF of the book 'A Night to Remember' by Charles Jordan that used to be available on NOAA and it has some more B&W damage pics from Guin but nothing in particular stuck out to me. I have the PDF on my computer but it's too large to upload to the forums here. I have some pics posted from it on page 42 of this forum, some are pretty impressive but nothing strikes me as 'F6'.
Also, this Murphysboro aerial is pretty impressive, right next to the railroad it looks like an entire neighborhood has been swept away.
View attachment 4942

Also, this pic right here:

View attachment 4941

Is this an aerial of a house from the air? Not quite sure what I'm looking at, apparently it was in White County, near Crossville, IL? I'm still not quite sure where the house ends and the foliage begins
That is a photo of a home from the ground that was so completely annihilated that it’s hard to tell it was a house. If you look slightly beyond the area where the home used to be you can see trees mowed down and debarked
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
583
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Some of the most impressive pictures of damage from Guin I could find online
That third to last pic actually shows very impressive ground scouring in the foreground; some of the most intense I’ve probably actually ever seen photographed in the state of Alabama. The way only bare soil and dirt clumps are left is consistent with damage from some of the most violent tornadoes.

It strongly reminds me of some of the scouring left behind by Moore 2013. What is even more impressive is that Guin was much faster moving than Moore, and Alabama soil is much less scour-prone than loamy, powdery Oklahoma soil. Overall, this lends more credence to the idea of Guin being a remarkably violent event. I’m less skeptical than I previously was.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
49
Location
Apple Valley, MN
That third to last pic actually shows very impressive ground scouring in the foreground; some of the most intense I’ve probably actually ever seen photographed in the state of Alabama. The way only bare soil and dirt clumps are left is consistent with damage from some of the most violent tornadoes.

It strongly reminds me of some of the scouring left behind by Moore 2013. What is even more impressive is that Guin was much faster moving than Moore, and Alabama soil is much less scour-prone than loamy, powdery Oklahoma soil. Overall, this lends more credence to the idea of Guin being a remarkably violent event. I’m less skeptical than I previously was.
Yeah it was pretty impressive. Also in one of Fujita's articles he said he would create a book containing damage pictures from his survey of the 1974 Super Outbreak. Unfortunately it seems like it was either never published or it has been lost. It might have contained more impressive damage photographs from Guin.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
49
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Found a view more from Guin via this link: https://abc3340.com/news/local/gall...r-shares-survival-story-from-historic-tornado

View attachment 4946View attachment 4947




Looks like a large section of town was completely swept away in the aerial photo, but hard to tell with the low quality imagery:
Interesting that does look intense. Also I wonder if the rumors of foundations being swept away came from cinder-block foundations being partly swept away like that first photo shows.
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Interesting that does look intense. Also I wonder if the rumors of foundations being swept away came from cinder-block foundations being partly swept away like that first photo shows.

Probably, Hackleburg and Smithville did similar things, so that's probably where Guin got its 'F6' reputation, along with being early in Fujita's career, many tornadoes he considered the most intense he surveyed (such as Guin or Jordan, Iowa) don't seem all that intense based on the available damage photographs. I'm not as skeptical about Guin as I once was, but I wish I could find even more photos of intense scouring, debarking and the like.
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Probably, Hackleburg and Smithville did similar things, so that's probably where Guin got its 'F6' reputation, along with being early in Fujita's career, many tornadoes he considered the most intense he surveyed (such as Guin or Jordan, Iowa) don't seem all that intense based on the available damage photographs. I'm not as skeptical about Guin as I once was, but I wish I could find even more photos of intense scouring, debarking and the like.
On this link you will find more Guin pics I've posted, I don't want to clog the thread up with them all over again, they're all available in the book "A Night to Remember" by Charles Jordan.
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Interesting that does look intense. Also I wonder if the rumors of foundations being swept away came from cinder-block foundations being partly swept away like that first photo shows.
NOAA has some more links on 1974 Super Outbreak in Alabama:

1. Main page: https://www.weather.gov/hun/hunsur_1974-04-03_aniv

2. Videos and the like....some footage from Guin Mobile Home Park: https://www.weather.gov/hun/interviews_videos_04031974

3. Links to damage pictures by county. Note that only 6 counties have damage pics available: https://www.weather.gov/hun/1974_ground_dampics_aniv

4. A PDF file of 'A Night to Remember' by Charles Jordan: https://web.archive.org/web/2016030...a/1974/April 3, 1974 A Night to Remember.pdf
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
That third to last pic actually shows very impressive ground scouring in the foreground; some of the most intense I’ve probably actually ever seen photographed in the state of Alabama. The way only bare soil and dirt clumps are left is consistent with damage from some of the most violent tornadoes.

It strongly reminds me of some of the scouring left behind by Moore 2013. What is even more impressive is that Guin was much faster moving than Moore, and Alabama soil is much less scour-prone than loamy, powdery Oklahoma soil. Overall, this lends more credence to the idea of Guin being a remarkably violent event. I’m less skeptical than I previously was.
One thing about Guin I'm curious about is how despite being fast-moving, rain-wrapped, nocturnal and an F5 is the rather low fatality count (28). I'd expect something much higher given the circumstances, the 'nocturnal' part in particular.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
49
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Tornado damage in William Bankhead National Forest.
 

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buckeye05

Member
Messages
583
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Found a view more from Guin via this link: https://abc3340.com/news/local/gall...r-shares-survival-story-from-historic-tornado

View attachment 4946View attachment 4947




Looks like a large section of town was completely swept away in the aerial photo, but hard to tell with the low quality imagery:

Two things:

First off, that first pic shows EXACTLY how the untrue rumor that the Guin tornado swept away house foundations in town got started. The untrained eye would see the bare dirt and assume that's what happened. However, with this type of construction, no slab was there to begin with. All that was torn away was the wooden floor platform. This reinforces what I previously thought about the origins of this rumor.

Second off all, your interpretation of the second pic is accurate. It appears that the Guin tornado cut a wide path of damage through town, but with only a narrow swath of extreme damage at the very center. The brownish streak of discoloration through the center may very well be ground scouring. I did a lot of digging up of info on Guin years ago, and I do have a low-quality, close up aerial shot of the center left-hand area visible in the above photo. It shows total obliteration of a residential area, with one larger house at the center completely slabbed. The site where I store my damage pics is down right now so I can't post it, but that slabbed house is actually also faintly visible in the above pic.

Now on the right hand segment of the narrow swath of extreme damage above, you can barely see another completely slabbed house just beyond Guin's downtown area. A close up aerial shot of that area was posted earlier, with a closer view of the aforementioned slabbed house. It's to the right of center near the top part of the photo, just right of that main road.
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Two things:

First off, that first pic shows EXACTLY how the untrue rumor that the Guin tornado swept away house foundations in town got started. The untrained eye would see the bare dirt and assume that's what happened. However, with this type of construction, no slab was there to begin with. All that was torn away was the wooden floor platform. This reinforces what I previously thought about the origins of this rumor.

Second off all, your interpretation of the second pic is accurate. It appears that the Guin tornado cut a wide path of damage through town, but with only a narrow swath of extreme damage at the very center. The brownish streak of discoloration through the center may very well be ground scouring. I did a lot of digging up of info on Guin years ago, and I do have a low-quality, close up aerial shot of the center left-hand area visible in the above photo. It shows total obliteration of a residential area, with one larger house at the center completely slabbed. The site where I store my damage pics is down right now so I can't post it, but that slabbed house is actually also faintly visible in the above pic.

Now on the right hand segment of the narrow swath of extreme damage above, you can barely see another completely slabbed house just beyond Guin's downtown area. A close up aerial shot of that area was posted earlier, with a closer view of the aforementioned slabbed house. It's to the right of center near the top part of the photo, just right of that main road.

So this is another aerial of Guin from a book called 'April 3, 1974: The Alabama Tornadoes' by C.F. Boone that a user on the old thread posted a ton of pics from, some had impressive ground levels of what looked like intense damage in Guin but hard to tell based on the quality. I wish I had a copy of the book or could find a PDF of it online but this is the only photograph available from it I've been able to come across. It looks a large building of some sort was completely leveled in the upper part of the picture and in the center right there appears to be an empty lot of houses and some intense ground scouring (notice the black splotches) but hard to tell for sure.

Guin.png
 
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Messages
332
Location
Missouri
Does anyone here know if any of the 1992 Widespread Outbreak tornadoes produced high-end F4 damage?

I assume you mean the one in November? Well, the most notable tornado from that outbreak by far is the Brandon, MS F4 that travelled 128 miles across Mississippi for 2.5 hours. It's path is pretty similar in places to the Candlestick Park storm of 1966 (in fact, it traveled through Rankin and Scott County).

The tornado talk article on it:


NOAA article on it:


WLBT article on it: https://www.wlbt.com/story/36902118...992-tornado-outbreak-on-its-25th-anniversary/

The most notable instance of damage that I can find a clear photograph of is of this large, well-constructed, brick mansion in the Easthaven subdivision of Jackson that was obliterated, killing all 4 occupants immediately. One of the occupants' bodies was found a quarter mile away from the foundation.

Screenshot_2020-11-21 EEO7GA7SKBHTHIXDYRRFCYVE64 jpg (JPEG Image, 1400 × 726 pixels) - Scaled ...jpg
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
583
Location
Riverside, Ohio
So this is another aerial of Guin from a book called 'April 3, 1974: The Alabama Tornadoes' by C.F. Boone that a user on the old thread posted a ton of pics from, some had impressive ground levels of what looked like intense damage in Guin but hard to tell based on the quality. I wish I had a copy of the book or could find a PDF of it online but this is the only photograph available from it I've been able to come across. It looks a large building of some sort was completely leveled in the upper part of the picture and in the center right there appears to be an empty lot of houses and some intense ground scouring (notice the black splotches) but hard to tell for sure.

View attachment 4951
So the large building that you see obliterated in the upper left hand corner was the Guin Mobile Home Plant. Its metal beam framing was badly mangled and partially pushed off the foundation. Here are some additional photos of the plant:

 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
583
Location
Riverside, Ohio
While on the topic of Guin, here is a very grainy shot of the very hard-hit residential area I mentioned earlier. You can see at least one house cleanly slabbed near the center of the pic:


There were also quite a few homes obliterated and swept away near the mobile home plant too:
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
49
Location
Apple Valley, MN
While on the topic of Guin, here is a very grainy shot of the very hard-hit residential area I mentioned earlier. You can see at least one house cleanly slabbed near the center of the pic:


There were also quite a few homes obliterated and swept away near the mobile home plant too:
Guin is starting to look more and more intense and my doubt on its rumored extreme intensity is starting to erode though I still haven’t seen anything on the level of Hackleburg or Smithville.
 
Messages
332
Location
Missouri
So the large building that you see obliterated in the upper left hand corner was the Guin Mobile Home Plant. Its metal beam framing was badly mangled and partially pushed off the foundation. Here are some additional photos of the plant:

What it did to the mobile home plant is pretty impressive, on par with Parkersburg and Wheatland in terms of industrial building damage.
Also, where'd you find that aerial of the plant? I haven't come across that anywhere else.
 
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