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andyhb

Member
Messages
190
Location
Norman, OK

I believe there's been some suspicion before that this picture was from the Brandenburg tornado (or the Louisville one) on 4/3/74, but it actually appears to be the Kennard, IN F4 tornado from the same day based on this account from the Hancock County Historical Society. It tracked through parts of Hancock, Rush, and Henry counties east of Indianapolis.
 

Oakhurst_Wx

Member
Messages
5
Location
Mars
Speaking of Brandenburg, given that Louisville and Brandenburg came from the same supercell, that may explain why Brandenburg was significantly stronger, due to the winds being confined in a smaller funnel than that of the Louisville tornado, which may have had an effect on the conservation of angular momentum, resulting in higher winds being present in the funnel of Brandenburg than Louisville. The same thing explains why Parkersburg weakened so quickly when it expanded from an EF4-5 to an EF2, and why Bassfield weakened somewhat when it expanded from its 1 miles wide stage, where it was producing significant ground scouring and extreme debarking to around 2 miles wide, where the circulation became less defined and the tornado weakened a bit.
 

Oakhurst_Wx

Member
Messages
5
Location
Mars
Speaking of Brandenburg, given that Louisville and Brandenburg came from the same supercell, that may explain why Brandenburg was significantly stronger, due to the winds being confined in a smaller funnel than that of the Louisville tornado, which may have had an effect on the conservation of angular momentum, resulting in higher winds being present in the funnel of Brandenburg than Louisville. The same thing explains why Parkersburg weakened so quickly when it expanded from an EF4-5 to an EF2, and why Bassfield weakened somewhat when it expanded from its 1 miles wide stage, where it was producing significant ground scouring and extreme debarking to around 2 miles wide, where the circulation became less defined and the tornado weakened a bit.
 

Oakhurst_Wx

Member
Messages
5
Location
Mars
However it’s possible the Brandenburg mesocyclone was much stronger than that of Louisville, and it may have cycled in a manner similar to the Tuscaloosa-ShoaL Creek Supercell, where one mesocyclone dies completely and a new one develops, not when the inflow changes its focal point to form a new mesocyclone.
 

Dissident Aggressor

Member
Hurricane Irma
Messages
23
Location
United States
Let's see if I remember how to do this properly...

Goessel scouring1.png

Goessel scouring2.jpg

Goessel scouring3.png

Sorry if the previews are too large; I can adjust them if need be. Anyway, these are all images I happen to have of ground scouring from the Goessel, KS F5 tornado of March 13, 1990 (the caption stating the year as 1960 is in fact a typo). Not particularly impressive, but it gives us something to look at from what is arguably among the most obscure F5 tornadoes.

Edit: Of course I find out after posting that additional Goessel pictures were shared in this thread back in September. None of these were a part of that post, so I guess it's still something to add to the conversation
 
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Messages
330
Location
Missouri
These pics are from Tornado Talk's article on Smithville, this tornado was easily the most ferocious of 4/27/11 (although Hackleburg still beats it in terms of duration of EF5 intensity and longevity, at least in my mind). Absolutely insane damage is documented below:

Source: https://www.tornadotalk.com/the-smithville-ms-ef-5-tornado-april-27-2011/

1. A bed & breakfast that was demolished, the majority of cinderblocks were pulverized into chunks, only a few remained in one piece:
Smithville 2.jpg

2. The mud you see on the foundation is actually granulated brick, considering the 70+ mph forward speed, this is extremely impressive.
Smithville 3.jpg

3. To quote the article directly "Perhaps the most intense vegetation damage ever photographed in tornado history. Not only was the bark blasted off of a particularly durable species of hardwood, pieces of the wood itself began to shave off".
Smithville 4.jpg

4. Supposedly a leaf is shorn into the bark of this tree, but it can't be confirmed( at least for now).
Smithville 5.jpg
 
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Messages
495
Location
Madison, WI
There are (probably apocryphal) tales circulated of how "Fujita himself" was so impressed by the damage from such-and-such tornado (most often Guin or Xenia from 1974) that he considered rating it an "F6." Alternatively, that Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 should have been rated F6 because DOW measured 318 MPH winds with it. Well, if there were such a thing as an EF6, Smithville would be it. Some of that damage is on another level even compared with other EF5s (IMO only Parkersburg, IA 2008 comes close, with extreme debris granulation).

Interestingly I seldom hear Jarrell mentioned in the "F6" conversation despite the totality of the destruction, I wonder if it is discounted because of its slow movement?
 
Messages
330
Location
Missouri
There are (probably apocryphal) tales circulated of how "Fujita himself" was so impressed by the damage from such-and-such tornado (most often Guin or Xenia from 1974) that he considered rating it an "F6." Alternatively, that Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 should have been rated F6 because DOW measured 318 MPH winds with it. Well, if there were such a thing as an EF6, Smithville would be it. Some of that damage is on another level even compared with other EF5s (IMO only Parkersburg, IA 2008 comes close, with extreme debris granulation).

Interestingly I seldom hear Jarrell mentioned in the "F6" conversation despite the totality of the destruction, I wonder if it is discounted because of its slow movement?
Good question about Jarrell, although I think it occasionally has been referred to as F6 in some articles or forums. It's slow forward movement probably has something to do with it, considering that there were quite a few people who thought Jarrell achieved no more than F3 intensity but it's being stationary allowed it to sweep everything away below it.
That said, I also wonder if Guin (or any other Alabama tornadoes of 4/3/74) may have done some damage like Smithville but for whatever reason it's difficult to track down photographs of it.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
43
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Good question about Jarrell, although I think it occasionally has been referred to as F6 in some articles or forums. It's slow forward movement probably has something to do with it, considering that there were quite a few people who thought Jarrell achieved no more than F3 intensity but it's being stationary allowed it to sweep everything away below it.
That said, I also wonder if Guin (or any other Alabama tornadoes of 4/3/74) may have done some damage like Smithville but for whatever reason it's difficult to track down photographs of it.
Some of the most impressive pictures of damage from Guin I could find online.
 

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Messages
330
Location
Missouri
Some of the most impressive pictures of damage from Guin I could find online.
Guin is such a mystery to me, it has a reputation as being one of the most intense tornadoes of all time (Grazulis and Fujita both said so) and yet all of the damage photos out there don't seem particularly impressive. I would love to find photographs of its path through the William B. Bankhead National Forest where it supposedly downed tons of trees but have yet to do so.
 
Messages
441
Location
Niagara Falls, Ontario
There are (probably apocryphal) tales circulated of how "Fujita himself" was so impressed by the damage from such-and-such tornado (most often Guin or Xenia from 1974) that he considered rating it an "F6." Alternatively, that Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 should have been rated F6 because DOW measured 318 MPH winds with it. Well, if there were such a thing as an EF6, Smithville would be it. Some of that damage is on another level even compared with other EF5s (IMO only Parkersburg, IA 2008 comes close, with extreme debris granulation).

Interestingly I seldom hear Jarrell mentioned in the "F6" conversation despite the totality of the destruction, I wonder if it is discounted because of its slow movement?
Jordan, IA (June 12, 1976) is another example which I think is especially weird considering none of the available damage photos appear to show anything that wouldn't be expected from a "typical" violent tornado. There's some fairly visible wind-rowing of debris in one shot, but not anywhere near as extreme as, say, Andover or Smithville.
 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
15
Location
Chicago, IL
I also did some more digging and found these photos from the Tri-State Tornado:

Annapolis
19250318ANNAPOLIS2.jpg
Gorham (the railroad tracks were the first thing the tornado encountered as it entered town)
19250318GORHAM.jpg
Aerial at Murphysboro
19250318MURPHYSBORO11.jpg
More Murphysboro
19250318MURPHYSBORO12.jpg
Note the brick home sheared off at ground level at the bottom left
19250318MURPHYSBORO14.jpg
De Soto
19250318DESOTO.jpg
19250318DESOTO2.jpg
In White County, probably near Crossville, IL (the tornado passed just south of here, crossing paths with the 2/28/2017 Crossville EF3 from the Perryville Supercell) this home was so badly annihilated it's hard to tell what was there. Note the granulated debris in the foreground and what appears to be debarked foliage in the background
19250318CROSSVILLE.PNG
Griffin
19250318GRIFFIN6.jpg
19250318GRIFFIN7.jpg
 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
15
Location
Chicago, IL
I also did some more digging and found these photos from the Tri-State Tornado:

Annapolis
View attachment 4925
Gorham (the railroad tracks were the first thing the tornado encountered as it entered town)
View attachment 4931
Aerial at Murphysboro
View attachment 4926
More Murphysboro
View attachment 4927
Note the brick home sheared off at ground level at the bottom left
View attachment 4928
De Soto
View attachment 4929
View attachment 4930
In White County, probably near Crossville, IL (the tornado passed just south of here, crossing paths with the 2/28/2017 Crossville EF3 from the Perryville Supercell) this home was so badly annihilated it's hard to tell what was there. Note the granulated debris in the foreground and what appears to be debarked foliage in the background
View attachment 4932
Griffin
View attachment 4933
View attachment 4934
Continued with Griffin
19250318GRIFFIN8.jpg
19250318GRIFFIN9.jpg
19250318GRIFFIN10.jpg
 
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