• Current Tropical Systems
    Ian
  • Welcome to TalkWeather!
    We see you lurking around TalkWeather! Take the extra step and join us today to see less ads and maybe even join the discussion.
    CLICK TO JOIN TALKWEATHER

andyhb

Member
Messages
701
Reaction score
1,552
Location
Norman, OK
Is it just me or do the best, minimally or non-watermarked tornado videos get the least views?
That one of the Stanton tornado in its wedge stage is great, but the others are hit or miss. The first one has the color saturation turned up way too high.
 
Messages
1,719
Reaction score
2,075
Location
Missouri
I was doing some very in-depth digging on newspapers.com and came across this photo of destruction from a tornado at Aberdeen, MS on April 20th, 1920. Very impressive damage.

View attachment 9841
A bit hard to tell what I'm looking at, is that extreme ground scouring or vegetation damage?
Also, the tornado that struck Aberdeen was the same tornado that crossed over into Alabama and struck areas in Marion County that were just north of Hackleburg and Phil Campbell, yes the entire 130 miles of this could've been a tornado family, but given Dixie long-trackers it's probable that at least 100 miles of it was a single violent wedge. Really hope more photos from this outbreak can be uncovered at some point, there's none in the MWR report on it.
 

andyhb

Member
Messages
701
Reaction score
1,552
Location
Norman, OK
In all fairness, one shouldn't expect amateur footage to have the same level of "polish" as professionally-filmed footage.
Turning up the color saturation to 1000 isn't a flaw in the footage. And that's not my point. There are many, many "amateur" tornado videos from the 90s and even 2000s/2010s that exceed most storm chaser/"professional" footage out there.

Don't you think that is being a little bit petty?
No, not really.
 

TH2002

Member
Messages
1,698
Reaction score
2,007
Location
California, United States
Special Affiliations
  1. SKYWARN® Volunteer
Turning up the color saturation to 1000 isn't a flaw in the footage. And that's not my point. There are many, many "amateur" tornado videos from the 90s and even 2000s/2010s that exceed most storm chaser/"professional" footage out there.


No, not really.
First of all, if you want to nitpick details about the footage then complain to the videographers. Complaining about it to me does nothing.

Did I ever say that all storm chaser fooage out there is the best? No, and if anything the best footage does come from the general public. But my point is in that terms of the level of polish in regards to things such as stabilization, color saturation, exposure, resolution among other things, professional footage is generally more well-rounded. Simply because not everyone wants to shell out $700 for a copy of Sony Vegas to make minor adjustments to videos.
 

andyhb

Member
Messages
701
Reaction score
1,552
Location
Norman, OK
...you posted the videos?

Y'all are taking this way too personally.
 

TH2002

Member
Messages
1,698
Reaction score
2,007
Location
California, United States
Special Affiliations
  1. SKYWARN® Volunteer
...you posted the videos?

Y'all are taking this way too personally.
Then don't tell me the videos I post are worthless. If you don't like em don't watch em, simple as that. IMO all tornado videos have value and many are underappreciated.

That being said, I'm not going to argue because I don't want to be the one who ruins this thread with an argument over whether a video is overexposed or has too much color saturation.
 

AngelAndHisWx

Member
Messages
49
Reaction score
134
Location
New Britain, CT
Then don't tell me the videos I post are worthless. If you don't like em don't watch em, simple as that. IMO all tornado videos have value and many are underappreciated.

That being said, I'm not going to argue because I don't want to be the one who ruins this thread with an argument over whether a video is overexposed or has too much color saturation.
Dude, the only one who would ruin the thread in this case is you from getting unnecessarily mad about a valid critique. Especially if you would take two seconds to look at the rest of the videos on the channel the Stanton video in question is from and realize the channel is run by an actual video producer whose LinkedIn mentions their experience in post production, implying they do, in fact, have access to the expensive softwares in question, and would actually imply the oversaturation (and for that matter to my eyes the contrast) was a stylistic choice and hence purposefully applied in post production. But we’ve digressed a ways from the thread’s purpose and I for one wouldn’t mind getting back on topic.
 
Last edited:

buckeye05

Member
Messages
2,389
Reaction score
3,100
Location
Riverside, Ohio
Never knew a photo of the April 27, 1942 Pryor, OK tornado existed. This tornado got a WHOLE lot more attention than the F4 tornado that hit the Oklahoma City Suburbs in June that year because of the Battle of Midway in WWII.

View attachment 9910
I wish there were damage photos available of the June 12, 1942 event. It sounds like it was very violent and devastating based on the descriptions of the area affected, potentially similar to the 1999 and 2013 events.
 

TH2002

Member
Messages
1,698
Reaction score
2,007
Location
California, United States
Special Affiliations
  1. SKYWARN® Volunteer
Dude, the only one who would ruin the thread in this case is you from getting unnecessarily mad about a valid critique. Especially if you would take two seconds to look at the rest of the videos on the channel the Stanton video in question is from and realize the channel is run by an actual video producer whose LinkedIn mentions their experience in post production, implying they do, in fact, have access to the expensive softwares in question, and would actually imply the oversaturation (and for that matter to my eyes the contrast) was a stylistic choice and hence purposefully applied in post production. But we’ve digressed a ways from the thread’s purpose and I for one wouldn’t mind getting back on topic.
*sigh*... guess it never takes two to argue. Blame one person then play innocent.

Back on topic, I wouldn't be surprised at all if the Hallam tornado had recieved an F5 rating pre 1997-1999 or so. It certainly would have gotten an F5 rating in the 1970's when Fujita was most active. While the damage isn't particularly impressive when compared to other F5/EF5 tornadoes, if Greensburg got an EF5 rating I could definitely see a low-end F5 rating being squeezed out of Hallam.
This one well-bolted home in particular outside of Hallam reminds me of an EF5-rated damage point from Moore 2013:
Dscn5771sm4.jpg


Moore:
EF5damageMoore2013.jpg
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
1,497
Reaction score
2,298
Location
Apple Valley, MN
*sigh*... guess it never takes two to argue. Blame one person then play innocent.

Back on topic, I wouldn't be surprised at all if the Hallam tornado had recieved an F5 rating pre 1997-1999 or so. It certainly would have gotten an F5 rating in the 1970's when Fujita was most active. While the damage isn't particularly impressive when compared to other F5/EF5 tornadoes, if Greensburg got an EF5 rating I could definitely see a low-end F5 rating being squeezed out of Hallam.
This one well-bolted home in particular outside of Hallam reminds me of an EF5-rated damage point from Moore 2013:
Dscn5771sm4.jpg


Moore:
EF5damageMoore2013.jpg
It’s pretty hard to tell if there anchor bolts on the foundation of the Hallam house
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
982
Reaction score
2,668
Location
Pennsylvania
I wish there were damage photos available of the June 12, 1942 event. It sounds like it was very violent and devastating based on the descriptions of the area affected, potentially similar to the 1999 and 2013 events.
I know I've got more somewhere, but I can't find them at the moment. Here are a few:

metadc1697742-xl-2012-201-OVZ001-7171.jpg


s-l1600.jpg


metadc611036-xl-2012-201-B1215-1130.jpg
 

TH2002

Member
Messages
1,698
Reaction score
2,007
Location
California, United States
Special Affiliations
  1. SKYWARN® Volunteer
It’s pretty hard to tell if there anchor bolts on the foundation of the Hallam house
Aren't those anchor bolts in the foreground? I could be wrong though, but I have read that at least one well-bolted home was swept away outside of Hallam.

Regardless, I know that the more common photos of home damage in Hallam (a 100-year old likely unanchored block foundation farmhouse) definitely wouldn't warrant an F5 rating.
hallam-099.jpg

hallam2-003.jpg

I do note in the second photo where the 2x4 closest to the camera seems to have "pivoted" at the point where an anchor bolt was located, while the cut nails also visible have had virtually no effect on securing the home.
 
Last edited:

locomusic01

Member
Messages
982
Reaction score
2,668
Location
Pennsylvania
There was also a small but very intense tornado outbreak on May 2, 1942 with three F4s each in Oklahoma and Kansas. Can't seem to find most of my photos from that event either for some reason, but here are two from the Pawhuska F4.

pawhuska-ok-f4.jpg


Pawhuska-filling-station.jpg


And of course during the violent 4/12/45 outbreak (best known for the Antlers F5, which I'm sure we've already covered so I probably don't need to post photos again) there was another intense F4 in the OKC Metro.

metadc1694069-xl-2012-201-OVZ001-7214.jpg


metadc1694246-xl-2012-201-OVZ001-7215.jpg


metadc597902-xl-2012-201-B1215-1134.jpg


metadc611107-xl-2012-201-B1215-1131.jpg


metadc596400-xl-2012-201-B1215-0198.jpg


corporal-ernest-montgomery-killed-when-jeep-was-mangled.jpg


Most of the casualties were around Tinker AFB - the last photo is a Jeep that was thrown a great distance (anywhere from 250 yards to over a mile, depending on the source), killing a Corporal Ernest Montgomery. I did a bunch of research on the OKC-area tornadoes because at one point I was planning to follow up the 5/3/99 article with an article about all of OKC's close calls.
 
Messages
1,719
Reaction score
2,075
Location
Missouri
There was also a small but very intense tornado outbreak on May 2, 1942 with three F4s each in Oklahoma and Kansas. Can't seem to find most of my photos from that event either for some reason, but here are two from the Pawhuska F4.

pawhuska-ok-f4.jpg


Pawhuska-filling-station.jpg


And of course during the violent 4/12/45 outbreak (best known for the Antlers F5, which I'm sure we've already covered so I probably don't need to post photos again) there was another intense F4 in the OKC Metro.

metadc1694069-xl-2012-201-OVZ001-7214.jpg


metadc1694246-xl-2012-201-OVZ001-7215.jpg


metadc597902-xl-2012-201-B1215-1134.jpg


metadc611107-xl-2012-201-B1215-1131.jpg


metadc596400-xl-2012-201-B1215-0198.jpg


corporal-ernest-montgomery-killed-when-jeep-was-mangled.jpg


Most of the casualties were around Tinker AFB - the last photo is a Jeep that was thrown a great distance (anywhere from 250 yards to over a mile, depending on the source), killing a Corporal Ernest Montgomery. I did a bunch of research on the OKC-area tornadoes because at one point I was planning to follow up the 5/3/99 article with an article about all of OKC's close calls.

This is a map of tornadoes occurring in or around the OKC area going back to 1880 all the way up to 2017. Like the counties in Missisippi and northern Alabama, this area seems to also be filled with "tornado highways" of a sort.....must be cursed.

bran1f5-800.png



Source:
 

Users who are viewing this thread

  • Western_KS_Wx
  • TH2002
Top