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So, hypothetically, if I were to do one more article (primarily focused on a single tornado to keep the workload more manageable), what would y'all like to see? A few I've considered at various points: 1899 New Richmond, 1913 Omaha, 1980 Grand Island "Night of the Twisters," 1966 Topeka, 1990 Plainfield, 2013 Moore, 2008 Parkersburg, 1919 Fergus Falls, 2011 El Reno/Chickasha/Goldsby, 1955 Blackwell/Udall, 2018 Carr Fire/Redding Fire Tornado, etc.

I've also kicked around the idea of doing a different form of article, but I'm not sure what. Maybe some kind of very broad overview of the worst outbreaks (though that's less interesting IMO), a rundown of some of the "strongest ever" contenders, maybe something breaking down the most extraordinary specific instances/types of damage or whatever.

Not sure what, if anything, I'll do from here, but I have to admit getting back into it has reminded me why I love it. Anyway, been drinking a bit so hopefully I'm not rambling too much lol
In terms of broad overview (that might me more manageable before you finally quit) you could do overviews of the concept of 'Dixie Alley', you could summarize some notable Dixie events, such as Natchez 1840, March 1875, April 20, 1920 and the 1932 outbreak and perhaps merge your 1884 Enigma article with it, combining several outbreaks that are poorly documented into a single manageable article (not sure if that makes sense but oh well I'm drinking a bit too lol). The 1966 Candlestick Park tornado could be another good idea for your blog, as it's just a single tornado (yeah, I'm sure it was actually a family of 3-4 separate tornadoes, but you get the idea) and it wasn't part of a larger outbreak, so probably wouldn't be too hard to find information on. Heck, I got a ton of photographs from that outbreak on my computer if you need them.
In terms of other smaller, localized events you could do also do the 1957 Ruskin Heights tornado (definitely overlooked if you live outside of the KC metro area) or 1985 Niles-Wheatland tornado, although that one is part of a larger outbreak which you might not want to do, not sure. Given how unusual the 1985 outbreak is I think it'd deserve a thorough treatment from your blog. For stuff outside the states you could do the 1987 Edmonton event, as it's probably the most violent tornado to form that far north and probably caused some of the most intense damage that was well-documented and outside of the United States.
Total shot in the dark here but it'd be awesome if you could do something on the 1995 Pampa, TX tornado and small regional outbreak associated with it (perhaps you could interview damage surveyors or stormchasers from that day as the damage survey results seem to have been accidentally discarded). Hopefully you don't close up shop too soon on your blog.
 
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All those ideas sound like they'd be great subject matter for your site, but for me personally, I think the idea of articles covering New Richmond and Fergus Falls excites me the most. I'd be incredibly interested in learning more about those, as they were likely some of the most violent ever recorded imo, and they happened so long ago, that I bet there are a lot of fascinating details that could be dug up that would otherwise be lost to time.

An article covering the F5s and most significant tornadoes of the 1974 Super Outbreak would be incredible too, as I feel that for whatever reason, was somewhat poorly documented for being relatively recent, or at least the information didn't "make it" through the transition to the internet age.
Guin especially, if he had to just focus on one tornado from outbreak, or the whole nocturnal sequence that occurred in Northern Alabama, as the stuff in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and other Midwestern states seems to have been much better-documented or more quickly transferred online than the Alabama tornadoes (Again Guin, in particular).

When you go to NWS's page on the 40th anniversary of the 1974 Super Outbreak, for the Alabama portion with damage photographs you come to a page that has this image:

map.png

The pink counties are where damage pictures were evidently taken by surveyors, I assume. Not every one of the counties can be clicked on, but the ones that can include Lawrence, Limestone and Madison, where both of the Tanner tornadoes went through. You can find damage aerials and ground level photos from both of these tornadoes as well damage photographs from Jasper, AL and Huntsville, AL on this and other pages on NWS's site. What you will notice is that Marion County, AL (where Guin is located) isn't available on this map, so no damage aerials or the like on here. The only places I've been able to locate Guin damage aerials are from out-of-print books scanned online or the occasional YouTube video (but nothing impressive, just ground level photographs). Really frustrating. Perhaps locomusic could track down a resident of Guin or local historian that is sitting on a ton of damage photographs we'd all really like to see.


 

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In terms of broad overview (that might me more manageable before you finally quit) you could do overviews of the concept of 'Dixie Alley', you could summarize some notable Dixie events, such as Natchez 1840, March 1875, April 20, 1920 and the 1932 outbreak and perhaps merge your 1884 Enigma article with it, combining several outbreaks that are poorly documented into a single manageable article (not sure if that makes sense but oh well I'm drinking a bit too lol). The 1966 Candlestick Park tornado could be another good idea for your blog, as it's just a single tornado (yeah, I'm sure it was actually a family of 3-4 separate tornadoes, but you get the idea) and it wasn't part of a larger outbreak, so probably wouldn't be too hard to find information on. Heck, I got a ton of photographs from that outbreak on my computer if you need them.
In terms of other smaller, localized events you could do also do the 1957 Ruskin Heights tornado (definitely overlooked if you live outside of the KC metro area) or 1985 Niles-Wheatland tornado, although that one is part of a larger outbreak which you might not want to do, not sure. Given how unusual the 1985 outbreak is I think it'd deserve a thorough treatment from your blog. For stuff outside the states you could do the 1987 Edmonton event, as it's probably the most violent tornado to form that far north and probably caused some of the most intense damage that was well-documented and outside of the United States.
Total shot in the dark here but it'd be awesome if you could do something on the 1995 Pampa, TX tornado and small regional outbreak associated with it (perhaps you could interview damage surveyors or stormchasers from that day as the damage survey results seem to have been accidentally discarded). Hopefully you don't close up shop too soon on your blog.

Guin especially, if he had to just focus on one tornado from outbreak, or the whole nocturnal sequence that occurred in Northern Alabama, as the stuff in Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee and other Midwestern states seems to have been much better-documented or more quickly transferred online than the Alabama tornadoes (Again Guin, in particular).

When you go to NWS's page on the 40th anniversary of the 1974 Super Outbreak, for the Alabama portion with damage photographs you come to a page that has this image:

View attachment 9529

The pink counties are where damage pictures were evidently taken by surveyors, I assume. Not every one of the counties can be clicked on, but the ones that can include Lawrence, Limestone and Madison, where both of the Tanner tornadoes went through. You can find damage aerials and ground level photos from both of these tornadoes as well damage photographs from Jasper, AL and Huntsville, AL on this and other pages on NWS's site. What you will notice is that Marion County, AL (where Guin is located) isn't available on this map, so no damage aerials or the like on here. The only places I've been able to locate Guin damage aerials are from out-of-print books scanned online or the occasional YouTube video (but nothing impressive, just ground level photographs). Really frustrating. Perhaps locomusic could track down a resident of Guin or local historian that is sitting on a ton of damage photographs we'd all really like to see.


Apparently tornado talk has pictures from the worst hit area of Guin that they will show during a future article on that tornado.
 

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So, hypothetically, if I were to do one more article (primarily focused on a single tornado to keep the workload more manageable), what would y'all like to see? A few I've considered at various points: 1899 New Richmond, 1913 Omaha, 1980 Grand Island "Night of the Twisters," 1966 Topeka, 1990 Plainfield, 2013 Moore, 2008 Parkersburg, 1919 Fergus Falls, 2011 El Reno/Chickasha/Goldsby, 1955 Blackwell/Udall, 2018 Carr Fire/Redding Fire Tornado, etc.

I've also kicked around the idea of doing a different form of article, but I'm not sure what. Maybe some kind of very broad overview of the worst outbreaks (though that's less interesting IMO), a rundown of some of the "strongest ever" contenders, maybe something breaking down the most extraordinary specific instances/types of damage or whatever.

Not sure what, if anything, I'll do from here, but I have to admit getting back into it has reminded me why I love it. Anyway, been drinking a bit so hopefully I'm not rambling too much lol
One I'd like to know more about that I think hasn't had a ton written about it is Jordan, IA 1976. There's a wicked-looking photo of it that was my desktop background back at home.
 

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or 1985 Niles-Wheatland tornado, although that one is part of a larger outbreak which you might not want to do, not sure. Given how unusual the 1985 outbreak is I think it'd deserve a thorough treatment from your blog.
Honestly, that outbreak has long been #1 on my list. It's an extraordinary event in a bunch of different ways, plus it occurred (partly) in my home state, which.. does not happen often. I've been gathering photos and research and I started putting together info for people I'd like to contact about it.

I've always stayed away because I didn't wanna do it unless I could cover it as well as it deserves. I've got it to a point where I think it's at least possible now, but it's gonna take a huge amount of work and I'm just not sure it's worth that anymore. I dunno. I should've stopped drinking a while ago I think.
 

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One I'd like to know more about that I think hasn't had a ton written about it is Jordan, IA 1976. There's a wicked-looking photo of it that was my desktop background back at home.
Whoo,ps yeah Jordan should've been on there as well. I never got too far into it, but I started a file on Jordan a few years ago and planned to get to it eventually.
 
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Total shot in the dark here but it'd be awesome if you could do something on the 1995 Pampa, TX tornado and small regional outbreak associated with it (perhaps you could interview damage surveyors or stormchasers from that day as the damage survey results seem to have been accidentally discarded). Hopefully you don't close up shop too soon on your blog.

For relatively modern (home video/NEXRAD-era) events and being thoroughly scientifically documented by VORTEX, the June 2 and 8, 1995 TX Panhandle outbreaks really are enigmas in terms of the damage and what actually transpired on the ground in the path of the tornadoes. Quite strange given how uncommonly destructive they were for the region (despite being a well-regarded/active chase region, the Panhandle and Western North Texas are so sparsely populated that it's unusual to have an outbreak with multiple tornadoes rated E/F3+ simply due to lack of DIs.

What little information I have been able to come across on these events, has mostly if not all been thanks to this thread.
 

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All those ideas sound like they'd be great subject matter for your site, but for me personally, I think the idea of articles covering New Richmond and Fergus Falls excites me the most. I'd be incredibly interested in learning more about those, as they were likely some of the most violent ever recorded imo, and they happened so long ago, that I bet there are a lot of fascinating details that could be dug up that would otherwise be lost to time.

An article covering the F5s and most significant tornadoes of the 1974 Super Outbreak would be incredible too, as I feel that for whatever reason, was somewhat poorly documented for being relatively recent, or at least the information didn't "make it" through the transition to the internet age.
I actually started on New Richmond before I decided on 5/3/99. Well, by "started" I mean set up a new work project, added a few things and then switched lol. But I had every intention of doing that tornado before I had a change of heart.
 
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One I'd like to know more about that I think hasn't had a ton written about it is Jordan, IA 1976. There's a wicked-looking photo of it that was my desktop background back at home.
We discussed it in this thread a while back:


I don't think Jordan would be rated EF5 nowadays, as the most extreme damage was largely went it was out of the town and while Fujita said it was among the most intense he'd surveyed you have to realize it was very early in his career, highly doubtful he'd say the same about Jordan if it had occurred in 1996 instead of 1976.
 
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For relatively modern (home video/NEXRAD-era) events and being thoroughly scientifically documented by VORTEX, the June 2 and 8, 1995 TX Panhandle outbreaks really are enigmas in terms of the damage and what actually transpired on the ground in the path of the tornadoes. Quite strange given how uncommonly destructive they were for the region (despite being a well-regarded/active chase region, the Panhandle and Western North Texas are so sparsely populated that it's unusual to have an outbreak with multiple tornadoes rated E/F3+ simply due to lack of DIs.

What little information I have been able to come across on these events, has mostly if not all been thanks to this thread.
I think 4-5 years ago Chuck Doswell traveled down to Pampa, TX and surrounding areas in order to gather information on tornadoes from this outbreak as so little is known about them, not sure if he had any luck though.
 
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I think 4-5 years ago Chuck Doswell traveled down to Pampa, TX and surrounding areas in order to gather information on tornadoes from this outbreak as so little is known about them, not sure if he had any luck though.

That makes sense, as I believe he chased it and took one of the famous videos of Pampa that was heavily featured in many a late '90s/early 2000s tornado documentary.

I am also a train buff, and I just ran across this image taken at Friona in the aftermath of the F4 that hit there:

 
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What I really need, I think, is a very rich old man whose dream in life is to pay someone a bunch of money to write tornado articles for him.

Anybody know how Bill Gates feels about tornadoes?
Perhaps you could join TornadoTalk at some point, so your talent could be put to use on a platform where more then 10 people read your blog entries. Lol.
Seriously though, they've covered lots of obscure events (like 1944 Appalachia outbreak, for instance) and might actually pay you to write stuff for them. You could upload your entries onto it at some point, if they allow it. Who knows?
 
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Random, but an oddball event. A rare violent tornado in Virginia. Richmond, Virginia to be specific. It occurred on August 6, 1993 and is notable for how narrow it's damage was. A building between two others collapsed while the two adjoining it did not. It also cut a huge gash through the local Walmart. A picture of the Walmart was in a bunch of National Geographic documentaries, magazine articles and my Klutz! Disaster Book that I had as a kid (ah, the 90s).

https://richmond.com/weather/memori...cle_c16435a1-ff32-500d-a76d-1de5fd1a5eb3.html
 

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I was thinking about doing a tornado history blog at one point but I decided against it as I really don't have the time and my writing skills are pretty meager and I'm not really one for interviewing.
 
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Pretty amazing, both of these photos are taken within a mile of the Bridge Creek–Moore tornado dissipating, and yet it's still violent right to the end.



I think lots of high-end events are violent to the very end, it'd be interesting to track down damage photographs of violent long-tracked tornadoes and to see how much extreme damage there was within the last mile or so of their path.
I read somewhere that some tornadoes actually do their most intense damage while in the dissipating (rope) phase, as the narrowing and constriction of the funnel accelerates the wind speeds, which is likely what happened with Elie, Manitoba.
 
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So, hypothetically, if I were to do one more article (primarily focused on a single tornado to keep the workload more manageable), what would y'all like to see? A few I've considered at various points: 1899 New Richmond, 1913 Omaha, 1980 Grand Island "Night of the Twisters," 1966 Topeka, 1990 Plainfield, 2013 Moore, 2008 Parkersburg, 1919 Fergus Falls, 2011 El Reno/Chickasha/Goldsby, 1955 Blackwell/Udall, 2018 Carr Fire/Redding Fire Tornado, etc.

I've also kicked around the idea of doing a different form of article, but I'm not sure what. Maybe some kind of very broad overview of the worst outbreaks (though that's less interesting IMO), a rundown of some of the "strongest ever" contenders, maybe something breaking down the most extraordinary specific instances/types of damage or whatever.

Not sure what, if anything, I'll do from here, but I have to admit getting back into it has reminded me why I love it. Anyway, been drinking a bit so hopefully I'm not rambling too much lol
Blackwell/Udall and New Richmond get my vote from these picks.
 

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