TH2002

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379
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California, United States
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So here's a pretty crazy story from the Parkersburg, Iowa EF5. A Dell Latitude D820 laptop belonging to Josh Crain was caught in the tornado and only found three days later, caked in mud and clearly sustained debris impacts. The screen ended up partially shattered but after a quick cleanup, the laptop booted right up and otherwise worked perfectly.


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Just another reason why I love Dell computers.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
540
Location
Apple Valley, MN
One of the most mysterious and significant tornadoes in USA history is the 1840 Natchez tornado. There is considerable uncertainty about the environment on the day of the tornado but there is some meteorological data available. Temperatures in Natchez that day were in the low 80s with a brisk southeasterly wind. There was dense overcast the morning which was likely a sign of a warm front lifting through the area. Sometime after 1:00 pm, the tornado touched down at least 20 miles SW of Natchez MS and moved NE. Not much detailed information is available about this section of the path in rural Louisiana but the devastation was reportedly immense. Homes on plantations were "swept like chaff from their foundations," trees were uprooted and crops were destroyed. Hundreds of slaves were reportedly killed on these plantations. When the tornado reached the Mississippi River, it turned and started traveling along the river. Thousands of trees were snapped, uprooted, or splintered with "not a particle of bark left upon the remaining stumps" along the river. Homes were also reportedly leveled in this area.

The at least mile-wide tornado maintained its intensity as it roared into the city of Natchez. Numerous steamboats and flatboats were sunk on the river resulting in >269 fatalities. In a part of the town known as "Under-the-Hill" homes/buildings were "razed to the ground" with some of these being reportedly swept away. On the other side of the river in the town of Vidalia, the courthouse was reportedly leveled to the ground. 48 people were killed on land in the town of Natchez with at least one fatality in Vidalia. A piece of a steamboat window was carried 30 miles. It's unknown what damage the tornado did after it left Natchez. At least 317 people were killed by the tornado but it is likely the death total was higher due to possible uncounted deaths in rural areas and bodies might have been carried downstream or sunk to the bottom of the river.
Plat_78491_1-1.png
Land survey map showing a portion of the tornado's track in Louisiana
 
Messages
906
Location
Missouri
One of the most mysterious and significant tornadoes in USA history is the 1840 Natchez tornado. There is considerable uncertainty about the environment on the day of the tornado but there is some meteorological data available. Temperatures in Natchez that day were in the low 80s with a brisk southeasterly wind. There was dense overcast the morning which was likely a sign of a warm front lifting through the area. Sometime after 1:00 pm, the tornado touched down at least 20 miles SW of Natchez MS and moved NE. Not much detailed information is available about this section of the path in rural Louisiana but the devastation was reportedly immense. Homes on plantations were "swept like chaff from their foundations," trees were uprooted and crops were destroyed. Hundreds of slaves were reportedly killed on these plantations. When the tornado reached the Mississippi River, it turned and started traveling along the river. Thousands of trees were snapped, uprooted, or splintered with "not a particle of bark left upon the remaining stumps" along the river. Homes were also reportedly leveled in this area.

The at least mile-wide tornado maintained its intensity as it roared into the city of Natchez. Numerous steamboats and flatboats were sunk on the river resulting in >269 fatalities. In a part of the town known as "Under-the-Hill" homes/buildings were "razed to the ground" with some of these being reportedly swept away. On the other side of the river in the town of Vidalia, the courthouse was reportedly leveled to the ground. 48 people were killed on land in the town of Natchez with at least one fatality in Vidalia. A piece of a steamboat window was carried 30 miles. It's unknown what damage the tornado did after it left Natchez. At least 317 people were killed by the tornado but it is likely the death total was higher due to possible uncounted deaths in rural areas and bodies might have been carried downstream or sunk to the bottom of the river.
View attachment 9370
Land survey map showing a portion of the tornado's track in Louisiana
The death toll from this is certainly way higher as slaves would not have been included among the fatalities.
This tornado is an example of a worst-case scenario, a tornado moving along a major mode of transport (Mississippi River) and encountering heavy traffic (steamboats); the modern-day equivalent would be a rain-wrapped EF5 following a freeway corridor in Dallas or Chicago during rush hour.
Interesting detail is that a tornado in the 1908 Dixie Outbreak took a path not that far off from this one.
This is perhaps the earliest significant Dixie event that we have on record

2 gendisasters articles on it:


Another article on it: https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/05/07/natchez-ms-tornado-1840/

I've always found it interesting that this thing appears to have followed the river directly and was right on it for much of its path, I can't think of another instance of a tornado following a large body of water for a significant time; it'd be interesting to study what happens underneath large bodies of water when violent tornadoes go over it or follow it for long periods of time.
 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
261
Location
Chicago, IL
The death toll from this is certainly way higher as slaves would not have been included among the fatalities.
This tornado is an example of a worst-case scenario, a tornado moving along a major mode of transport (Mississippi River) and encountering heavy traffic (steamboats); the modern-day equivalent would be a rain-wrapped EF5 following a freeway corridor in Dallas or Chicago during rush hour.
Interesting detail is that a tornado in the 1908 Dixie Outbreak took a path not that far off from this one.
This is perhaps the earliest significant Dixie event that we have on record

2 gendisasters articles on it:


Another article on it: https://www.ustornadoes.com/2017/05/07/natchez-ms-tornado-1840/

I've always found it interesting that this thing appears to have followed the river directly and was right on it for much of its path, I can't think of another instance of a tornado following a large body of water for a significant time; it'd be interesting to study what happens underneath large bodies of water when violent tornadoes go over it or follow it for long periods of time.
I have noticed that there have been instances of tornadoes riding valleys, such as with the Shoal Creek - Ohatchee Valley EF4 Tornado on April 27, 2011 (the second EF4 that was spawned from the Tuscaloosa supercell after the Tuscaloosa Tornado dissipated). Some of these valleys may hold rivers within them. However, I'm not sure if it's just me but the tornado, given that map, didn't appear to track along with the river for a long time, and just happened to pass over the worst possible spot and the worst possible time.
 

andyhb

Member
Messages
373
Location
Norman, OK

NWS Tulsa put together a wonderful GIS page covering the 4/12/1945 outbreak in OK, which included the devastating Antlers tornado.
 
Last edited:
Messages
906
Location
Missouri
I have noticed that there have been instances of tornadoes riding valleys, such as with the Shoal Creek - Ohatchee Valley EF4 Tornado on April 27, 2011 (the second EF4 that was spawned from the Tuscaloosa supercell after the Tuscaloosa Tornado dissipated). Some of these valleys may hold rivers within them. However, I'm not sure if it's just me but the tornado, given that map, didn't appear to track along with the river for a long time, and just happened to pass over the worst possible spot and the worst possible time.
Come to think there was a tornado (F4) in the 1953 Flint-Worcester outbreak that spent most of its life traveling over Lake Michigan which makes it impossible to ascertain its exact path length; it'd be interesting if such a thing occurred today and were documented, if a massive tornado traveling over a body of water has any unusual effects underneath, if the vortex extends to the bottom of the lake or not, etc.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
540
Location
Apple Valley, MN

NWS Tulsa put together a wonderful GIS page covering the 4/12/1945 outbreak in OK, which included the devastating Antlers tornado.
Uh this photograph in that slide is actually from the Colfax WI tornado I think.
1619814327981.png
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
540
Location
Apple Valley, MN


This environment produced a family of at least 4 tornadoes. One or two of these tornadoes were reportedly pretty intense. A 1322 lb pump machine was thrown 60 yards, numerous trees were debarked, a high school consisted of two 65-foot-high single-span reinforced concrete structures was mostly leveled, another small single-span concrete structure was blown down, people were reportedly carried up to nearly a mile, large palm trees were uprooted or snapped, a 711 square foot house consisting of brick walls and concrete pillars collapsed, large chunks of concrete were carried over 100 yards, and numerous weak homes were completely leveled.
WARNING: There are a few scenes that show dead bodies or injured people
 

buckeye05

Member
Messages
995
Location
Riverside, Ohio
The damage honestly makes me believe it undoubtedly had EF5 potential
Yeah I agree honestly. I read that article too and that thing was absolutely a high-end event. The 170 MPH wind estimate they assigned is ridiculous. Yet another ridiculously low-balled rating from MEG.

NWS Dallas/Fort Worth and NWS Springfield are also really, really bad about doing that too.
 
Messages
834
Location
Madison, WI
Yeah I agree honestly. I read that article too and that thing was absolutely a high-end event. The 170 MPH wind estimate they assigned is ridiculous. Yet another ridiculously low-balled rating from MEG.

NWS Dallas/Fort Worth and NWS Springfield are also really, really bad about doing that too.

They write that they consider the Holly Springs Motorsports Park "the most impressive tornado damage in 2015," a year which also included Rochelle.
 
Messages
80
Location
Augusta, Kansas
Yeah I agree honestly. I read that article too and that thing was absolutely a high-end event. The 170 MPH wind estimate they assigned is ridiculous. Yet another ridiculously low-balled rating from MEG.

NWS Dallas/Fort Worth and NWS Springfield are also really, really bad about doing that too.
Would you say it should have been rated at least a high-end EF4? I never knew how violent that tornado was until now.
 
Messages
906
Location
Missouri
Due to my interest in the 1984 Soviet Union Outbreak, I dug up some more Russian videos of tornadoes on YouTube:

1. This is another tornado that apparently hit Kostroma in 2003:


2. A documentary on the 1984 outbreak, which emphasis on Ivanovo, I assume. Some impressive photos of mangled automobiles (probably the most intense auto damage I've seen outside of North & South America, really) and some photos of leveled forests:


3. So this last video I'm not sure of the location (might not be Russia) but it's definitely foreign so I'm including it there. This is EXTREMELY impressive up-close footage of a tornado tearing through a greenhouse area.

 

Brice Wood

Member
Messages
128
Location
Virginia
Rochelle and Holly Springs are definite contender that could’ve been EF5s, I understand Holly springs was more violent than most people thought but Rochelle to me, beats it as a better contender to be an EF5 tornado
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
540
Location
Apple Valley, MN
What was one of the strongest tornadoes in German history struck the villages/towns of Lind, Süchteln, Anrath, and Krefeld on July 1, 1891. Numerous homes were leveled with some possibly being swept away, entire farms were "shattered," hundreds of trees were uprooted or snapped, floors and large pieces of debris were carried for hundreds of yards, and a new hall was swept away.

Gastst%C3%A4tte_Dommers_nach_dem_Tornado_vom_1._Juli_1891_%28Haus_Reinartz_im_Rade%29.jpg

18910701lind_schaden1.jpg
 

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