MNTornadoGuy

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526
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Apple Valley, MN
Totally random, but I was looking for some photos from a particular tornado and ended up coming across this:

sqH2Efy.jpg


The tornado itself (an F2 that struck Vinita, OK on 6/11/1970) isn't that noteworthy, but the picture just really amuses me.
It looks like a tiny drillbit tornado went through that home lol.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
223
Location
Pennsylvania
Oh, I forgot to post this the other day. The final track map for the Tupelo - Gainesville outbreak:

OpmdjKG.jpg


I'm sure the paths aren't 100% perfect, but I'm reasonably confident it should be accurate to within a mile or two here & there. The biggest question marks were with precise start/end points and tornadoes vs. tornado families, but again, it should be pretty close. I tried to get the widths close based on reports + damage point locations but I had to make some of the smaller tornadoes slightly wider just for visibility purposes.

The ratings are just my own personal opinions, but they're mostly in line with Grazulis besides Coffeeville and Columbia. I added McMinville–Campaign and Notchy Creek as new tornadoes because they're the ones I was most confident about, but there are a couple of other possibles.

As for the final stats:

Melbourne–Larkin, AR F2: 12 miles | 1 death
Bethlehem–Beech Creek–Hohenwald, TN F4: 64 miles | 7 deaths
Booneville, MS F3: 14 miles | 4 deaths
Coffeeville, MS F4: 17 miles | 6 deaths
Columbia, TN F4: 14 miles | 5 deaths
Black Zion, MS F2: 5 miles | ? deaths
Tupelo, MS–Red Bay, AL F5: 69 miles | 242+ deaths
Elkwood, TN–Flintville, TN F3: 71 miles | 6 deaths
McMinville–Campaign, TN F2: 10 miles | 0-2 deaths?
Notchy Creek, TN F2: 9 miles | 0 deaths
Acworth, GA F3: 11 miles | 0 deaths
Gainesville, GA F4(s): 9 miles? | 203+ deaths
Carnesville–Lavonia, GA F2: 14 miles | 1 death
Anderson, SC F2: 18 miles | 1 death

Total: 1 F5 | 6 F4 | 3 F3| 6 F2 | 476+ deaths
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
526
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Oh, I forgot to post this the other day. The final track map for the Tupelo - Gainesville outbreak:

OpmdjKG.jpg


I'm sure the paths aren't 100% perfect, but I'm reasonably confident it should be accurate to within a mile or two here & there. The biggest question marks were with precise start/end points and tornadoes vs. tornado families, but again, it should be pretty close. I tried to get the widths close based on reports + damage point locations but I had to make some of the smaller tornadoes slightly wider just for visibility purposes.

The ratings are just my own personal opinions, but they're mostly in line with Grazulis besides Coffeeville and Columbia. I added McMinville–Campaign and Notchy Creek as new tornadoes because they're the ones I was most confident about, but there are a couple of other possibles.

As for the final stats:

Melbourne–Larkin, AR F2: 12 miles | 1 death
Bethlehem–Beech Creek–Hohenwald, TN F4: 64 miles | 7 deaths
Booneville, MS F3: 14 miles | 4 deaths
Coffeeville, MS F4: 17 miles | 6 deaths
Columbia, TN F4: 14 miles | 5 deaths
Black Zion, MS F2: 5 miles | ? deaths
Tupelo, MS–Red Bay, AL F5: 69 miles | 242+ deaths
Elkwood, TN–Flintville, TN F3: 71 miles | 6 deaths
McMinville–Campaign, TN F2: 10 miles | 0-2 deaths?
Notchy Creek, TN F2: 9 miles | 0 deaths
Acworth, GA F3: 11 miles | 0 deaths
Gainesville, GA F4(s): 9 miles? | 203+ deaths
Carnesville–Lavonia, GA F2: 14 miles | 1 death
Anderson, SC F2: 18 miles | 1 death

Total: 1 F5 | 6 F4 | 3 F3| 6 F2 | 476+ deaths
Interesting how most of the significant tornadoes from the outbreak were only produced by ~3 supercells.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
223
Location
Pennsylvania
Interesting how most of the significant tornadoes from the outbreak were only produced by ~3 supercells.
Yeah, there were likely several other supercells present - there were a bunch of reports throughout the region of straight-line wind damage (probably from downbursts), large/accumulating hail, etc. - but the tornado activity mostly came from supercells interacting with the warm front.
 
Messages
107
Location
Northern Europe
Color photography really makes all the difference vs. black and white. Many of these pics were previously only available in black and white, and being in color really helps you notice a lot more details in terms of damage you'd otherwise miss.

A couple interesting things about Brandenburg; there seems to have been quite a bit of tree damage but none of the trees appear completely debarked, partially yes, but not completely.

Also, this photo:

View attachment 6825

This was previously only available in B&W form. One thing I've noticed in the color photo is on the ground (particularly near the foundation) there seems to be what looks like lots of ground wood; pretty extreme granulation on par with Joplin, Parkersburg and Smithville. Quite a bit of the damage aerials of this tornado through town (particularly the one with the water tower) look a lot like the EF5 damage corridor through Smithville. Now, if only we could find high quality color photographs of Guin damage, then we could really definitely say which of the two tornadoes (Bradenburg or Guin) was the most violent of 4/3/74.
Also, where did you find these color photographs? And do you know of any tools for colorizing B&W photographs within reasonable accuracy? I know on the old thread someone managed to do so with Tupelo 1936 damage aerials, wondering if you might know of any programs that allowed them to do so.
Of all the pre-2007 tornadoes mentioned in this thread, the following show the clearest, high-resolution, photographic evidence of F5 winds:
  • Tristate 1925
  • Tupelo MS 1936
  • Antlers OK 1945
  • Glazier–Higgins TX/Woodward OK 1947
  • Leedey OK 1947
  • Beecher MI 1953
  • Udall KS 1955
  • Hudsonville MI 1956
  • Dunlap IN 1965
  • Pittsfield OH 1965
  • Brandenburg KY 1974
  • Guin AL 1974
  • Niles OH/Wheatland PA 1985
  • Andover KS 1991
  • Jarrell TX 1997
  • Bridge Creek OK 1999
  • Harper KS 2004
To these I might also add Kansas City MO (Ruskin Heights) 1957 and Topeka KS 1966, but those are a bit iffier.

To me, clear, contextual indicators of F5-level winds involve high-resolution, close-up images of the following:
  • Debris granulation
  • Extensive wind-rowing
  • Long-distance, downstream dispersion far from empty foundations
  • Low-lying shrubs uprooted/debarked
For instance, the images from Brandenburg and Smithville MS 2011 show extensive evidence of these effects.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
526
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Next 5/6/1965 tornado: the 2nd Fridley tornado. This large and deadly tornado touched down in extreme NW Minneapolis and moved NNE striking the Northern Ordnance, Inc further damaging it. Steel transmission towers were also downed near the facility by the 2nd tornado. After unroofing and ripping apart numerous homes and a school in Fridley, its direction shifted straight north and devastated the Rice Creek Terrace neighborhood. It is here where the tornado reached maximum intensity. Multiple homes were completely leveled and a row of 6 homes was swept away. Trees in the forest behind the subdivision were debarked. After this point, the tornado weakened slightly but grew to a width of ~1260 yards with the eastern edge destroying mobile homes in a trailer park. The tornado then moved into Spring Lake Park where it damaged another school and destroyed more homes before dissipating near the intersection of Hwy 65 & Hwy 10.
96026018_2526417077576027_8609754195328761856_n.jpg
1908213_10155511068165321_7776378417061262009_n.jpg
Screenshot_2020-08-24 1965May6-50thAnniversary pdf(18).png


ffrrsx.jpg
B9317134541Z.1_20150430153939_000_GVOAL3M5I.1-0.jpg
146353340_4092642314102819_3733555038367043313_o.jpg
Screenshot_2021-04-10 Fridley 1965 May 7th Tornado aftermath(2).png
Screenshot_2021-04-10 Fridley 1965 May 7th Tornado aftermath.png
 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
259
Location
Chicago, IL
I've been looking around with the newspapers.com free trial lately, and wow, it is an absolute GEM for Tornado History Enthusiasts. Here are some of the most notable images I've found below:

Remains of Lower Peach Tree, AL after an F4 Tornado slammed right into the community in the early morning hours on March 21, 1913

19130321LOWERPEACHTREEAL2.PNG

Aerial of the Sneed, AR area after it was hit by an F5 Tornado on April 10th, 1929

19290410SNEED2.PNG

Remains of the McDonald Chapel, AL area after the tornado of April 15th, 1956

19560415MCDONALDCHAPEL12.PNG

A tornado-torn Primrose, NE in 1965

19650508PRIMROSE7.PNG

Hamburg, IN after the F4 Tornado of April 3, 1974

19740403HAMBURG2.PNG

Violent Tornado Damage from a tornado in the Bright, IN area on June 2, 1990. This is the only photographic evidence of violent tornado damage I have seen from a tornado that day. I feel terrible for that poor kid...

19900602BRIGHT.PNG

A devastated subdivision in Murfreesboro, TN after an F4 Tornado hit it on January 24, 1997

19970124SOUTHRIDGE7.PNG

An aerial view shows the wrecked aftermath of a trailer park from the 2000 Pine Lake, Alberta Tornado

20000714PINELAKEAERIAL.PNG

The remains of the Fairfield Subdivision after the catastrophic wind came to Madison, MS on November 24th, 2001

20011124MADISONAERIAL.PNG
 

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Marshal79344

Member
Messages
259
Location
Chicago, IL
Do y’all think Moore 2013 or Bridge Creek 1999 was stronger? in my humble opinion, i’m on 2013s side
Depends where you look at it. I'll tell ya the intensity reached by 1999 in the Bridge Creek area and the intensity reached by 2013 in Moore was quite similar, although I think 1999 has the edge.
 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
259
Location
Chicago, IL
I think Moore 2013 produced more intense damage in general. the ground scouring was Jarrell Esque
The ground scouring produced by the 2013 Tornado was significantly aided by the sheer amount of flying debris within the funnel of the tornado itself. The debris also aided in the intensity of tree debarking as well, since debarking is usually done by debris. The 1999 Tornado was able to achieve this on a similar level while hitting less substantial structures. This is what mainly drives my opinion.
 

speedbump305

Member
Messages
494
Location
Cypress Texas
The ground scouring produced by the 2013 Tornado was significantly aided by the sheer amount of flying debris within the funnel of the tornado itself. The debris also aided in the intensity of tree debarking as well, since debarking is usually done by debris. The 1999 Tornado was able to achieve this on a similar level while hitting less substantial structures. This is what mainly drives my opinion.
True, but it is really hard to decide which was stronger
 
Messages
892
Location
Missouri
True, but it is really hard to decide which was stronger
Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 was definitely way more intense, the ground scouring and low-lying vegetation stripping it did in the Bridge Creek area was among the most intense ever documented and this would have been when going through a rural area with a very low amount of structures to aid in that. The radar measurements when it was over the Bridge Creek area were unbelievable. The 1999 tornado was on the ground for nearly 1.5 hours, whereas Moore 2013 only lasted for 40 minutes or so. While tornado duration isn't a surefire indicator of intensity, I do think the supercell that spawned the 1999 event was much more powerful and had much energy, and thus so did the tornado. I will concede that Moore 2013 did much more intense damage to the city of Moore itself, whereas the 1999 tornado had weakened to F4 status by the time it reached Moore and only did a handful of instances of F5 damage in the Moore city limits after briefly re-strengthening for small periods of time.
So, it depends how you want to look at it.
 

speedbump305

Member
Messages
494
Location
Cypress Texas
Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 was definitely way more intense, the ground scouring and low-lying vegetation stripping it did in the Bridge Creek area was among the most intense ever documented and this would have been when going through a rural area with a very low amount of structures to aid in that. The radar measurements when it was over the Bridge Creek area were unbelievable. The 1999 tornado was on the ground for nearly 1.5 hours, whereas Moore 2013 only lasted for 40 minutes or so. While tornado duration isn't a surefire indicator of intensity, I do think the supercell that spawned the 1999 event was much more powerful and had much energy, and thus so did the tornado. I will concede that Moore 2013 did much more intense damage to the city of Moore itself, whereas the 1999 tornado had weakened to F4 status by the time it reached Moore and only did a handful of instances of F5 damage in the Moore city limits after briefly re-strengthening for small periods of time.
So, it depends how you want to look at it.
Yeah i do agree with you. Bridge Creek was very violent and was for sure more violent than Moore 2013
 
Messages
892
Location
Missouri
I've been looking around with the newspapers.com free trial lately, and wow, it is an absolute GEM for Tornado History Enthusiasts. Here are some of the most notable images I've found below:

Remains of Lower Peach Tree, AL after an F4 Tornado slammed right into the community in the early morning hours on March 21, 1913

View attachment 8548

Aerial of the Sneed, AR area after it was hit by an F5 Tornado on April 10th, 1929

View attachment 8549

Remains of the McDonald Chapel, AL area after the tornado of April 15th, 1956

View attachment 8552

A tornado-torn Primrose, NE in 1965

View attachment 8550

Hamburg, IN after the F4 Tornado of April 3, 1974

View attachment 8551

Violent Tornado Damage from a tornado in the Bright, IN area on June 2, 1990. This is the only photographic evidence of violent tornado damage I have seen from a tornado that day. I feel terrible for that poor kid...

View attachment 8554

A devastated subdivision in Murfreesboro, TN after an F4 Tornado hit it on January 24, 1997

View attachment 8555

An aerial view shows the wrecked aftermath of a trailer park from the 2000 Pine Lake, Alberta Tornado

View attachment 8556

The remains of the Fairfield Subdivision after the catastrophic wind came to Madison, MS on November 24th, 2001

View attachment 8557
I'll have to give that site a try sometime. Out of curiosity have you been able to find anything on there from Guin or the 1974 Tanner tornadoes?
 
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speedbump305

Member
Messages
494
Location
Cypress Texas
The Brandenburg Tornado is what i like to call “ The Smithville tornado of the 1970s “ because it was very likely the most violent of the 1970s. yes even more than the Smithfield tornado and possibly more than the Niles tornado of the 1980s and Andover Tornado.
 

pohnpei

Member
Messages
422
Location
shanghai
Bridge Creek-Moore 1999 was definitely way more intense, the ground scouring and low-lying vegetation stripping it did in the Bridge Creek area was among the most intense ever documented and this would have been when going through a rural area with a very low amount of structures to aid in that. The radar measurements when it was over the Bridge Creek area were unbelievable. The 1999 tornado was on the ground for nearly 1.5 hours, whereas Moore 2013 only lasted for 40 minutes or so. While tornado duration isn't a surefire indicator of intensity, I do think the supercell that spawned the 1999 event was much more powerful and had much energy, and thus so did the tornado. I will concede that Moore 2013 did much more intense damage to the city of Moore itself, whereas the 1999 tornado had weakened to F4 status by the time it reached Moore and only did a handful of instances of F5 damage in the Moore city limits after briefly re-strengthening for small periods of time.
So, it depends how you want to look at it.
Moore 2013 also went through more rural areas before it went into the town of Moore. The damage in these areas with less structure nearby was also extreme like ground severely scoured, trees and shrubs 100% debarked, cars also mangled. (Near May Avenue for example)Oil tanks that Bridge Creek tossed in rural area wasn't longer than Moore 2013 either. The damage Moore 2013 in rural areas often get overlooked and likely tornado reached peak intensity before it hit the town. Actually Moore 2013 did 200mph rating, near EF5 damage right after it fully condensed and the visual apperance remained violent level right before it lifted. The duration of a tornado maintained has no direct correlation with its peak intensity at all. Smithville wasn't very long-lived compared to many other violent tornados that day.Chetek MI 2017 tornado maintained like two and a half hour and was an EF3 level tornado.
I would say both of them were strongest tornado in the history. The existing DI cann't distinguish which one was more violent. In this situation, any affirmative judgment is purely subjective.
 
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