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Messages
486
Location
Missouri
Here is a detailed study of the 1932 Deep South tornado outbreak. I don't have a ProQuest account so I can't access it but if anyone here has a ProQuest account you should check it out.
Some more information on 1932 Dixie Outbreak:

1. https://www.alabamapioneers.com/193...sibly-300-people-in-alabama-on-march-21-1932/

2. https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/coola...math-of-the-1932-tornado-outbreak-in-alabama/

3. NOAA's page on it: https://www.weather.gov/bmx/event_03211932

A lot of Dixie outbreaks of the past seem to have been rather poorly documented. Another thing to remember about these outbreaks is that fatality and injury rates are all likely hugely underestimated, due to how newspapers of the day often paid little, if any attention to the fates of African-American sharecroppers due to the racial bigotry and segregation of the era. Considering the significant Black population among the Deep South, (the "Black Belt" area) at the time, the fatality rates for many of the tornadoes among the 1932 and other Dixie outbreaks are probably double or triple the officially recorded numbers.

I'm a college student so I was able to access the PDF on the study of 1932, so I've posted it below:
 

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Messages
486
Location
Missouri
Especially for the 1920 Dixie outbreak, there is barely any information available online about it and it seems to have been overshadowed by the 1920 Palm Sunday outbreak. One of the tornadoes from the 1920 Dixie outbreak seems to have been similar to the 2011 Hackleburg tornado.


The MWR on the 1920 Dixie Outbreak in 2 PDF files, not sure if I already showed this to you, but oh well:

1. https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/j..._1920_48_203b_tiema_2_0_co_2.xml?tab_body=pdf

2. https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/j..._1920_48_205_ttoaia_2_0_co_2.xml?tab_body=pdf

Yeah, one of the tornadoes followed a path through Alabama that was virtually identical to 2011 Hackleburg, the only difference is it started a bit farther south in MS before crossing the state line. There was another tornado in MS that went through Neshoba County and had a path extremely similar to the 2011 Philadelphia tornado.
 
Messages
486
Location
Missouri
The MWR on the 1920 Dixie Outbreak in 2 PDF files, not sure if I already showed this to you, but oh well:

1. https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/j..._1920_48_203b_tiema_2_0_co_2.xml?tab_body=pdf

2. https://journals.ametsoc.org/view/j..._1920_48_205_ttoaia_2_0_co_2.xml?tab_body=pdf

Yeah, one of the tornadoes followed a path through Alabama that was virtually identical to 2011 Hackleburg, the only difference is it started a bit farther south in MS before crossing the state line. There was another tornado in MS that went through Neshoba County and had a path extremely similar to the 2011 Philadelphia tornado.
Addendum: that VLT tornado's path in MS went through Monroe County, which is where Smithville is located. An eyewitness description of the tornado describes it as looking like a giant cloud moving along the ground and a "fire" in front of the wind, perhaps the "fire" was actually "smoke" that was the big black wedge of the tornado beneath a low-hanging mesocyclone and clouds base? So yeah this thing was a clone in appearance to Hackleburg 2011 as well.
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
159
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Addendum: that VLT tornado's path in MS went through Monroe County, which is where Smithville is located. An eyewitness description of the tornado describes it as looking like a giant cloud moving along the ground and a "fire" in front of the wind, perhaps the "fire" was actually "smoke" that was the big black wedge of the tornado beneath a low-hanging mesocyclone and clouds base? So yeah this thing was a clone in appearance to Hackleburg 2011 as well.
I haven't seen any damage photographs from any of the 4/20/1920 tornadoes. Also one of the F4s struck down near Philadelphia MS too.
 

Austin Dawg

Member
Messages
167
Location
Leander, Texas
Addendum: that VLT tornado's path in MS went through Monroe County, which is where Smithville is located. An eyewitness description of the tornado describes it as looking like a giant cloud moving along the ground and a "fire" in front of the wind, perhaps the "fire" was actually "smoke" that was the big black wedge of the tornado beneath a low-hanging mesocyclone and clouds base? So yeah this thing was a clone in appearance to Hackleburg 2011 as well.
Fascinating. Sooner or later someone might find the reason that tornadoes seem to follow similar paths.
 
Messages
486
Location
Missouri
Fascinating. Sooner or later someone might find the reason that tornadoes seem to follow similar paths.
The thing I've noticed is that it's specifically the section of northwestern Alabama from Marion and Lamar Counties to Limestone and Madison Counties that seems to be a highway for long-tracked, rain-wrapped and fast moving F/EF4 to F/EF5 tornadoes. These tornadoes also have a tendency to cross into far southern Tennessee (Lincoln and Franklin County, specifically) before dissipating. It must be the perfect balance of geography, climate, local topography, dew points and atmospheric instability.

Also, Sand Mountain in NE Alabama is apparently one of those geographical features that can actually enhance tornado formation. Check out this study on the effects of terrain on the formation and intensity of tornadoes:

 
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Messages
523
Location
Madison, WI
Now that I think about it, video of Niles/Wheatland shows debris falling before the tornado arrives, and I'm pretty sure people in the path of the Tri-State Tornado described such phenomena. I wouldn't doubt it from a long-tracked storm like that.

Thanks to @Fred Gossage for digging up another version of that WBRC footage for me. It's chopped up and doesn't include the full sequence (such as the on-air meteorologist's stunned reaction to being told that debris was landing at the station, before it was handed to him), but shows some of what I was talking about:

 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
159
Location
Apple Valley, MN
I found some photographs from the August 11, 2017 Chifeng China tornadoes (a family of three violent wedge tornadoes.) It has been posted in here before that it swept away well-anchored brick homes which makes it wonder if one of the tornadoes reached EF5 intensity.
AFECE52D-A29D-4B75-9A45-3CB35D489C61.png 0D904177-5866-4176-BC2E-FDCF9C2F39C1.jpeg
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
159
Location
Apple Valley, MN

andyhb

Member
Messages
223
Location
Norman, OK
Thanks to @Fred Gossage for digging up another version of that WBRC footage for me. It's chopped up and doesn't include the full sequence (such as the on-air meteorologist's stunned reaction to being told that debris was landing at the station, before it was handed to him), but shows some of what I was talking about:


I have the 33+ minute clip of them covering the TCL-BHM tornado when it was approaching the latter city (and also the extended clip of them covering it when it was going through Tuscaloosa).
 

Fred Gossage

Member
Meteorologist
PerryW Project Supporter
Messages
189
Location
Florence, AL
I have the 33+ minute clip of them covering the TCL-BHM tornado when it was approaching the latter city (and also the extended clip of them covering it when it was going through Tuscaloosa).
I'm begging you to please post. Even as someone who worked the coverage with them that day, I haven't been able to get anything from archives besides what they have uploaded over the years, and now they've taken most of that down too.
 

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