• Welcome to TalkWeather!
    We would love for you to become a part of our community.
    Take a moment to look around and join the discussion.
    CLICK HERE TO JOIN TALKWEATHER
1-800-PetMeds
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
I dunno, I'd guess probably they just think it's too labor-intensive to digitize a ton of photos and maps and notes and whatnot. I think a lot of it is also unsorted/unlabeled, which is problematic. I'm sure there would be enough interest that they could find volunteers if they wanted to, though.
This is one of the biggest problems of the Information Age: so many files need to be digitized but for whatever reason it's either too labor-intensive to do so or they weren't neatly categorized in the analog information days so they're impossible to neatly sort and catalog for information into digital databases; had a huge discussion about this in one of my archiving classes for my MLIS degree last year; really illuminating stuff.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
Is Texas Tech what you got that collection of Brandenburg photos from?
Interesting they'll allow you to access those online but not a whole bunch of others, or maybe they have a limit on how much you can access for free online?
So, do they likely have tons of damage photographs from both of the Tanner tornadoes, Jasper, Guin, Huntsville and many tornadoes from that day that are likely impossible to find elsewhere?
It's been quite a while now but IIRC they didn't actually have the Brandenburg photos posted anywhere at the time. I was just poking around the root directory and saw them listed in a folder somewhere. They might have them posted publicly now, I haven't checked.

Anyway, yeah, there are boxes full of survey photos, film, slides, documents, news clippings, interviews, etc. It's hard to say exactly what they have since many of the labels are so generic, but here's an inventory of their holdings: https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/ttusw/00271/tsw-00271.html

It's like a treasure hoard for severe weather nerds. As you'd imagine, there's a bunch of stuff from decades' worth of events. Incidentally, I believe all (or at least most) of the survey photos from 5/31/85 are stored there, too.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
This is one of the biggest problems of the Information Age: so many files need to be digitized but for whatever reason it's either too labor-intensive to do so or they weren't neatly categorized in the analog information days so they're impossible to neatly sort and catalog for information into digital databases; had a huge discussion about this in one of my archiving classes for my MLIS degree last year; really illuminating stuff.
Yeah, automation has made it easier in recent years, but it's often still labor-intensive and/or costly when you're dealing with huge collections. It's a real bummer because there's SO much stuff out there - not only at TTU but at a bunch of other institutions as well - but most of it just sits around in archives collecting dust.

Some will pull and digitize information/photos for you even if you can't make it in person, but it's usually not cheap. I had to pay for some photos in my Tupelo article, and I found several others that I really wanted to use but were so expensive (relatively speaking) that I just couldn't justify it. Libraries and museums are usually better about that, though. I got some photos from the 1920 Palm Sunday outbreak from a museum and they only charged me like $5 to copy + mail them.

'Course the copies ended up being pretty small and low-quality, and I still don't understand why they couldn't have just scanned them and sent them digitally, but that's a whole other thing.
 
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
It's been quite a while now but IIRC they didn't actually have the Brandenburg photos posted anywhere at the time. I was just poking around the root directory and saw them listed in a folder somewhere. They might have them posted publicly now, I haven't checked.

Anyway, yeah, there are boxes full of survey photos, film, slides, documents, news clippings, interviews, etc. It's hard to say exactly what they have since many of the labels are so generic, but here's an inventory of their holdings: https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/taro/ttusw/00271/tsw-00271.html

It's like a treasure hoard for severe weather nerds. As you'd imagine, there's a bunch of stuff from decades' worth of events. Incidentally, I believe all (or at least most) of the survey photos from 5/31/85 are stored there, too.
Really neat, I think I have found PDFs of some of Fujita's files online (including his original map of Guin's path, I'll have to dig through my computer for it later) where exactly in here did you find Brandenburg? Or is it basically impossible to answer that question as they were in a generically-labeled folder? Really cool if 1985 survey photos are stored there, as the only ones I've seen are from Storm Data or various online sources.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
Really neat, I think I have found PDFs of some of Fujita's files online (including his original map of Guin's path, I'll have to dig through my computer for it later) where exactly in here did you find Brandenburg? Or is it basically impossible to answer that question as they were in a generically-labeled folder? Really cool if 1985 survey photos are stored there, as the only ones I've seen are from Storm Data or various online sources.
No, I found the Brandenburg stuff (and the Jarrell survey photos, come to think of it) digging through the website's root directory, but it appears that's no longer accessible. The root directory is basically a listing of all the files and folders for the website itself - the inventory I linked to is for all the physical files they have stored. The Brandenburg photos might be publicly accessible somewhere on the site now but I haven't checked it in a long time. Probably should, actually.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
So, looking through my Super Outbreak files quick, there were ~50 survey photos from Brandenburg, 13 from Xenia, 27 from North Alabama (not labeled but it's the Tanner/Harvest area IIRC) and two from Monticello. I might've posted some of them before, I dunno. Anyway, it's not much and I'm sure it's only a tiny fraction of what's in the archives, but some of it is pretty interesting.

Aside from the Super Outbreak, there were also about 60 from Jarrell, most of which I've either used in my article or posted here at some point. I think there were some from Lubbock and a couple other events as well, but I can't remember which ones.
 
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
So, looking through my Super Outbreak files quick, there were ~50 survey photos from Brandenburg, 13 from Xenia, 27 from North Alabama (not labeled but it's the Tanner/Harvest area IIRC) and two from Monticello. I might've posted some of them before, I dunno. Anyway, it's not much and I'm sure it's only a tiny fraction of what's in the archives, but some of it is pretty interesting.

Aside from the Super Outbreak, there were also about 60 from Jarrell, most of which I've either used in my article or posted here at some point. I think there were some from Lubbock and a couple other events as well, but I can't remember which ones.
Would it be some that you posted in this forum years ago?

 

Marshal79344

Member
Messages
305
Reaction score
794
Location
Chicago, IL
I usually depend on newspapers and lucky finds on Facebook to find most of my tornado information. I have dug through eBay, WorthPoint, Flickr, and Twitter in order to find most of my archives. Occasionally, you will find an old gem. A good example of this is this Facebook photo showing damage from the Waupaca, WI Tornado of September 26, 1951.

19510926WAUPACA3.jpg
 

MNTornadoGuy

Member
Messages
654
Reaction score
999
Location
Apple Valley, MN
Some of them, yeah.

Speaking of the TTU archives, you can get a look at just a small fraction of the insane amount of stuff they have in this video on the Lubbock tornado:

I wonder if they have stuff from the May 6 1965 Twin Cities tornado outbreak because I see they have files listed with that date.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
I usually depend on newspapers and lucky finds on Facebook to find most of my tornado information. I have dug through eBay, WorthPoint, Flickr, and Twitter in order to find most of my archives. Occasionally, you will find an old gem. A good example of this is this Facebook photo showing damage from the Waupaca, WI Tornado of September 26, 1951.

View attachment 9799
Nice! It's rarely mentioned anywhere, but it was a pretty significant event.

(Btw, I was today years old when I learned the forum can embed imgur albums so that you don't have to post them all individually.)

 
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
Some of them, yeah.

Speaking of the TTU archives, you can get a look at just a small fraction of the insane amount of stuff they have in this video on the Lubbock tornado:

Wow, I haven't been able to find much in the way of damage photographs from Lubbock; I don't think it deserved an F5 rating but it is a historic event so I've always wished I could dig up more photos from it
I'll bet they have a lot of stuff on Palm Sunday 1965 and possibly photographs from April 1-2, 1974, the outbreak that preceded 4/3/74 (to me, I think they're all part of the same outbreak cycle, similar to how 4//27/11 was preceded by April 25 and 26, 2011 but that's a whole other discussion).
 
Last edited:
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
Nice! It's rarely mentioned anywhere, but it was a pretty significant event.

(Btw, I was today years old when I learned the forum can embed imgur albums so that you don't have to post them all individually.)

Lol same here, if I had done this sooner that would've saved me lots of time and effort on adding contributions and saved space; on the other hand, this forum may not have to gotten to 200+ pages if I had saved space sooner lol.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
I wonder if they have stuff from the May 6 1965 Twin Cities tornado outbreak because I see they have files listed with that date.
From what I understand, they basically have all of the photos, notes, etc. from all of the surveys Fujita and his team did. Or at least everything that he saved.. which is probably everything given how meticulous he was lol
 
Messages
1,028
Reaction score
1,270
Location
Missouri
No, I found the Brandenburg stuff (and the Jarrell survey photos, come to think of it) digging through the website's root directory, but it appears that's no longer accessible. The root directory is basically a listing of all the files and folders for the website itself - the inventory I linked to is for all the physical files they have stored. The Brandenburg photos might be publicly accessible somewhere on the site now but I haven't checked it in a long time. Probably should, actually.
Supposedly Fujita planned to write a book on the 1974 Super Outbreak and there would have been tons of damage survey photos in it; unfortunately he never got around to it. Perhaps if he did that would save us lots of trouble in digging through archives or sending out emails to survivors and eyewitnesses of historic events.
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
Wow, I haven't been able to find much in the way of damage photographs from Lubbock; I don't think it deserved an F5 rating but it is a historic event so I've always wished I could dig up more photos from it
I'll bet they have a lot of stuff on Palm Sunday 1965 and possibly photographs from April 1-2, 1974, the outbreak that preceded 4/3/74 (to me, I think they're all part of the same outbreak cycle, similar to how 4//27/11 was preceded by April 25 and 26, 2011 but that's a whole other discussion).
 

locomusic01

Member
Messages
351
Reaction score
1,027
Location
Pennsylvania
So, what was the F5 rating for Lubbock based on, my Internet is a bit iffy tonight so I can't really watch videos on YT right now.
Been a long time since I've really researched Lubbock much, but if memory serves, the F5 rating came from the Guadalupe neighborhood where many of the deaths occurred. A number of homes were swept cleanly away (though most were older and probably not that well-built), vehicles were thrown significant distances and destroyed, etc.

There's also a pretty fascinating paper here that explores the damage in detail, focusing particularly on engineered structures:

Pretty sure I've got some photos from the Guadalupe area. I'll check and post them tomorrow.

Edit: I should add that, from what I remember, it probably wouldn't have warranted an EF5 by modern standards. Violent for sure, but not exceptionally so.
 
Last edited:

Users who are viewing this thread

  • Z
Top