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Significant Tornado Events - Global Edition

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On 28 August 2020, a violent long-tracked supercell produced hail between 5 and 8 centimeters in diameter and a downburst, whose gusts of wind reached 170km/h.
In the mountainous area of northern Mallorca, a wedge tornado F2, (Surely F3 at certain times) reached a size greater than 1.3 kilometers while devastating and uprooting whole rows of trees in the forests of the north.
 
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In February 2021, a tornado supercell in southwestern Spain produced a multi-vortex tornado in a town of Huelva. Some high-end F2 damage was reported, including fallen trees, several uprootings, the roof and exterior walls of an industrial warehouse falling off, and a heavy truck dumped 50 meters from the road.
 
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On October 4, 2007, a powerful squall line hit the Balearic Islands with widespread wind gusts of 130km/h. In some observatories in the interior and east of Mallorca, gusts of 183 km/h and 195 km/h respectively were measured, making this system one of the most severe in Europe in the last decade. Several supercells embedded within the system left large hail, but one of them stood out for the number of tornadoes it produced, up to 4 along the island. The first of them was a violent wedge tornado that caused severe damage to industrial warehouses, businesses and private homes in Palma de Mallorca. It was rated EF-3 and its diameter exceeded a kilometer in width at certain times.
 

buckeye05

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On October 4, 2007, a powerful squall line hit the Balearic Islands with widespread wind gusts of 130km/h. In some observatories in the interior and east of Mallorca, gusts of 183 km/h and 195 km/h respectively were measured, making this system one of the most severe in Europe in the last decade. Several supercells embedded within the system left large hail, but one of them stood out for the number of tornadoes it produced, up to 4 along the island. The first of them was a violent wedge tornado that caused severe damage to industrial warehouses, businesses and private homes in Palma de Mallorca. It was rated EF-3 and its diameter exceeded a kilometer in width at certain times.

The 2007 Mallorca tornado is particularly interesting to me. Video of it shows the parent storm had a pitch-black night-like darkness that I've seen associated with some violent US tornadoes, namely Joplin. Calling it a "violent wedge" is a bit of a hyperbole though, and it was actually rated F2. ESWD lists a fatality with that one though, and I can't think of any recent fatal tornadoes in Spain off the top of my head.
 
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On June 1, 1999, a strong tornado classified as F3 occurred in the forests of Soria, in central-northeast Spain. Apparently it split pinus silvestris with trunks up to 30 cm in diameter and caused a corridor of very serious and considerable damage. Below I leave you the conversations of some users and graphic documents about the damage of the whirlwind.


 

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The 2007 Mallorca tornado is particularly interesting to me. Video of it shows the parent storm had a pitch-black night-like darkness that I've seen associated with some violent US tornadoes, namely Joplin. Calling it a "violent wedge" is a bit of a hyperbole though, and it was actually rated F2. ESWD lists a fatality with that one though, and I can't think of any recent fatal tornadoes in Spain off the top of my head.
You're talking about the Can Valero F2, which was the second tornado dropped by this supercell, and caused F2 damage to industrial polygons, but there was a F3 tornado first before that one. This the first tornado, the F3. This supercell dropped four across the island!!
 

buckeye05

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You're talking about the Can Valero F2, which was the second tornado dropped by this supercell, and caused F2 damage to industrial polygons, but there was a F3 tornado first before that one. This the first tornado, the F3. This supercell dropped four across the island!!
I had no idea. ESWD lists only three tornadoes with that event: an F2 and two F1s. Do you have any source material where I can read about the F3?
 
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Unfortunately, the only evidence of that first tornado is this video. The state meteorology agency (AEMET) was so busy rating the four tornadoes that the first, the strongest, went almost unnoticed. As for ESWD, they only collect the "famous" tornadoes, those that are given some coverage. In fact, in Spain there are some F3 tornadoes that are not even registered in the base.
 

A Guy

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To be honest, I've been a little bit skeptical about the original path length, and didn't know it had since been split up into five separate tornadoes, Makes sense though. I used Google maps to track the path through the different villages it hit, and there were a lot of long gaps where it hit nothing but fields and caused no damage, leaving plenty of areas for breaks in the damage path. If ESWD says it was five, I believe them.
One thing I'd add myself is that I have a rule that very long paths are likely to be families until proven otherwise. The number of putative 200 km+ tornadoes in the USA I have confidence in is very small. Such tornadoes are invariably very wide and have long streaks of severe damage. I'd need better evidence to be convinced the path was continuous when the Bihucourt family didn't have those features.
 
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