Sawmaster

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Call me old school, but it's proper etiquette to sign written messages. It also adds a personal touch which I like. Just how many of us old Southerners are :cool:

Phil
 

TH2002

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i'll just shut up forever i guess. cause apparently im not professional enough to chat on this site.
You have to remember that this is a forum, not Twitter. Low-effort five word posts don't cut it. Don't just SAY the damage from Holly Springs was bad for example. Actually tell us about and/or show us the specifics of what you found.

i don't know how to find useful information or cool facts for this site that haven't already been posted before. so what am i supposed to do? have an account on this site that doesn't post anything??? apparently so.

like seriously. what the heck can i add to this whole thing that hasn't been brought up before? im pretty much useless here....
It's really not that hard. One thing I like to do is use Tornado Archive and other similar sites. I pick a random year that peaks my interest, then pick a significant tornado and google the date (e.g. june 8 1995 tornado) and you can find a lot of information that way. Some tornadoes are obviously more loosely documented than others, but it's always worth it if you can uncover some damage photos and/or useful knowledge. This thread may be over 400 pages long but there's still A LOT of tornadoes that haven't been discussed here, or that haven't been discussed much.
 

TH2002

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Speaking of Holly Springs, I recently came across a collection of ground level photos from the Lamar Rd vicinity which may have not been posted before. The tornado was very likely at EF5 intensity in this area, though as previously mentioned, the NWS Memphis survey was... iffy, at best. Anyhow:
CXBW_heUkAAlR3E.jpg

A large section of Lamar Rd itself was scoured away. Intense ground scouring is also evident in the background.


CRFLAA63GZEBBP5C5F7MSCRPQA.jpg

Well built homes away from the areas impacted by the most violent winds sustained roof and exterior wall loss. Poorly built homes were wiped out. Vehicles were thrown and mangled, and vast swaths of deforestation occurred. Note possible ground scouring in the bottom right photo, can't confirm this, although there was definite scouring elsewhere.

535304

Vehicle tossed and crushed.

The following photos are all of the same home, the only one in the area to be surveyed. It was a slab built, brick veneer frame home that was given a 165MPH EF3 rating, though I can't infer anything else about its construction. It is important to note that regardless of construction, this house didn't even sustain a direct hit, with the tornado's inner core passing between this house and another, though it was probably either on the edge of the violent damage core or hit by a subvortex.
535328

535306


Still the same home, but the vehicle damage gets much, MUCH worse:
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There's no way to pinpoint exactly where the vehicle originated, but it ended up here, in a completely mangled and unrecognizable heap. It may have originated from one of the destroyed homes on Cherry Brown Rd or Brown Apple Ln, roads that run perpendicular to Lamar Rd, with a possible distance range of 0.05 miles to a quarter mile. Approximately 2.25 miles to the southwest of this vicinity, another cluster of homes was destroyed on Hoover Rd, so it may have originated from as far as there, or any of the rural roads between the areas. Who knows?

Fig-16-ashland-google-earth-scouring-scaled.jpg

Between Cherry Brown Rd and Apple Ln, extreme ground scouring occurred, still plainly visible in this satellite view taken three months after the tornado.

holly-springs-diagram.jpg
The red line approximately marks the inner core of the tornado. Labels are as follows:

1. Home on the DAT, which the previous photos were of. The empty slab is from cleanup.
2. Home of unknown construction. The tornado's inner core just barely missed this home, though it likely still experienced winds of EF4+ intensity. It was destroyed (degree of damage unknown) and rebuilt after the tornado.
3. Was a mobile home before the tornado. Destroyed and replaced.
4. Home of unknown construction. Direct hit; it may have been a poorly constructed home, or a slab built home where the foundation was bulldozed during cleanup.

At least two mobile homes were eviscerated here; and multiple other homes sustained lesser degrees of damage. One of interest is a home out of frame at bottom left that probably sustained EF1 damage; it seems to have been abandoned after the tornado, as the 2021 satellite imagery showed it with the same degree of damage as in the March 2016 imagery.
 

Oakhurst_Wx

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Pretty excited that I finally found a couple of photos from the Salix, IA F4 the day before New Richmond. The quality is terrible, but I don't care. I didn't really expect to find anything at all. They're from a series of shots taken by the head of the Sioux City weather office, so I'm hoping the originals (or at least decent-quality reproductions) are still out there somewhere.

Anyway, this is the Malloy home just southeast of Salix, or what little was left of it. Parts of the house (described as a "fine new home") were carried up to a mile and five of the seven family members were killed; two of them were thrown nearly half a mile.

LEiDWaj.jpg


This is a neighbor's home a few hundred yards away - it, too, was a large house that had been built fairly recently. Witnesses described seeing the whole structure lift high up into the air before breaking apart and "scattering to the four winds." Thankfully the family had made it to their storm cellar and were unhurt.

GCFRhxu.jpg


From various descriptions of the path, it sounds like this tornado produced some pretty high-end debarking + ground scouring. It was only around 300 yards wide (probably more like 50-100 yards if you're talking about the swath of intense damage) but it moved quite slowly and was widely visible as it crossed the Missouri River and approached the south side of town. It was described as moving "only as fast as a man can walk," although it probably wasn't that slow. I'm reasonably confident this was part of a family of at least three tornadoes, but the others mostly destroyed barns and silos and whatnot.
I was wondering where you found these?
 

Western_KS_Wx

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Decided to do some digging to see if I could find more damage photos from Greensburg to add to this photo album I’m making for the event, and I came across some truly insane damage photos that again show just how powerful this tornado was.
58D402AC-D9A1-448A-BCD1-A2B82A2E8C00.jpeg
This is the Greensburg Mennonite Church, a large brick building located in northern sections of the city pictured in 2005.
C2C57D2F-EBE5-4F7E-8265-E088B3F6920A.jpeg
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And this is what remained of it after the tornado completely flattened and largely swept it away. The damage to the church is among the most impressive I’ve seen, and it’s pretty clear the tornado was at EF5 strength here. The tree damage in this area was extreme to say the least, every tree and shrub near this location was completely stripped and debarked entirely.
8DF741CD-61B1-49E3-9A3A-715715778A09.jpeg
This photo was taken near the church looking west. There were several homes that lined the street to the right and left that were completely swept away.
3D423F78-03E7-4CF4-97E5-D5D54507A574.jpeg
A4B973E5-4D60-43A6-B43B-AB832B977F8D.jpeg
More instances of probable EF5 damage in northern sections of the city. In the first photo to the left of the white car there was a row of homes that all but vanished. In the second photo the foundation of a swept away home is visible to the left of the blue tent.
 
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Decided to do some digging to see if I could find more damage photos from Greensburg to add to this photo album I’m making for the event, and I came across some truly insane damage photos that again show just how powerful this tornado was.
View attachment 15010
This is the Greensburg Mennonite Church, a large brick building located in northern sections of the city pictured in 2005.
View attachment 15011
View attachment 15012
View attachment 15013
View attachment 15014
And this is what remained of it after the tornado completely flattened and largely swept it away. The damage to the church is among the most impressive I’ve seen, and it’s pretty clear the tornado was at EF5 strength here. The tree damage in this area was extreme to say the least, every tree and shrub near this location was completely stripped and debarked entirely.
View attachment 15016
This photo was taken near the church looking west. There were several homes that lined the street to the right and left that were completely swept away.
View attachment 15017
View attachment 15018
More instances of probable EF5 damage in northern sections of the city. In the first photo to the left of the white car there was a row of homes that all but vanished. In the second photo the foundation of a swept away home is visible to the left of the blue tent.
okay yeah my thoughts on how intense the damage in greensburg were completely wrong. btw, any further progress on your other maps?
 

Western_KS_Wx

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Hate to just fill up this thread with purely Greensburg stuff but I came across another remarkable damage feat from this tornado.
95BCE249-2EF7-4F60-A4EA-72751737E5F5.jpeg
Along Kansas Avenue a large brick reinforced building that was especially well built (visible at right) was utterly obliterated, and a section was completely leveled to the ground. Homes nearby were completely destroyed as well, many swept cleanly away.
7936259D-D286-4F17-A0B8-0EFE7EA4ECCA.jpeg
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Here’s the front portion and an aerial showing the back section of the building. The contextual damage in this area was extremely intense, several trees were completely debarked and shrubs were stripped bare as well.
E7E49554-8236-419C-AC31-096C7F79C4BC.jpeg
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C90FC271-CC91-4A2F-AC1A-D2F4514AD17F.jpeg
These photos again show just how remarkably intense the tree and contextual damage was in this residential area. Debris granulation is evident as well, several homes once stood along this block. The second and last photo are incredible.
68E94D0A-5361-4A16-B92D-7E5C93D1B225.jpeg
This image is looking north, the only standing section of the brick building is visible to the left of the tree in center. Note the completely debarked trees nearby.
2064D930-CEB6-41C9-B6B2-ACBBBB49A16A.jpeg
The foundations of swept away homes are visible in this image and a section of the brick building is visible in the right corner of the photo.
64CE2ADE-A82B-4077-8B86-15D5B9DBB167.jpeg
This is one of the more extreme instances of damage I’ve come across from this tornado which also occurred in the area mentioned above. According to the person who took this photo, this home was swept cleanly away and the front concrete porch and steps (visible at right) were snapped off and deflected upward.
DFC33849-2862-45E8-8910-17BB4D68CF5A.png
This fire hydrant that was pulled out of the ground was also located just behind the brick building that was leveled.

It’s pretty clear the tornado was also at EF5 intensity in this area and once more this is some of the most impressive tornado damage to a well constructed brick building I’ve seen. These images really show this tornado is among the most powerful recorded since the 2000’s, and further solidifies its EF5 rating.
 

Sawmaster

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Fire hydrants aren't as strong as one might think, but without a strong impact knocking it loose and breaking it's standpipe to have something that small and heavy pulled from the ground is incredible. Also, the strong brick building appears to be brick veneer over block (CMU) which while much stronger than the usual brick veneer over wood, it would still have linear weaknesses along the horizontal mortar joint lines. About as strong as you'll get without concrete and rebar. Definitely EF-5 to me.

Phil
 
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Hate to just fill up this thread with purely Greensburg stuff but I came across another remarkable damage feat from this tornado.
View attachment 15019
Along Kansas Avenue a large brick reinforced building that was especially well built (visible at right) was utterly obliterated, and a section was completely leveled to the ground. Homes nearby were completely destroyed as well, many swept cleanly away.
View attachment 15020
View attachment 15021
Here’s the front portion and an aerial showing the back section of the building. The contextual damage in this area was extremely intense, several trees were completely debarked and shrubs were stripped bare as well.
View attachment 15022
View attachment 15023
View attachment 15024
These photos again show just how remarkably intense the tree and contextual damage was in this residential area. Debris granulation is evident as well, several homes once stood along this block. The second and last photo are incredible.
View attachment 15025
This image is looking north, the only standing section of the brick building is visible to the left of the tree in center. Note the completely debarked trees nearby.
View attachment 15026
The foundations of swept away homes are visible in this image and a section of the brick building is visible in the right corner of the photo.
View attachment 15029
This is one of the more extreme instances of damage I’ve come across from this tornado which also occurred in the area mentioned above. According to the person who took this photo, this home was swept cleanly away and the front concrete porch and steps (visible at right) were snapped off and deflected upward.
View attachment 15030
This fire hydrant that was pulled out of the ground was also located just behind the brick building that was leveled.

It’s pretty clear the tornado was also at EF5 intensity in this area and once more this is some of the most impressive tornado damage to a well constructed brick building I’ve seen. These images really show this tornado is among the most powerful recorded since the 2000’s, and further solidifies its EF5 rating.
which would you say was stronger, greensburg or parkersburg?
 

TH2002

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The 1975 Omaha tornado, while not overlooked by any means, is a storm that I think people often forget just how violent it was. Many homes were swept away, and although many of these were not well constructed (likely what led to the F4 rating), the tornado probably had F5 potential at some point and I personally think it's a more compelling case for such a rating than some of the official F5's from the same time period.

Regardless of construction, the sheer number of homes it swept away in this densely populated area is nothing short of impressive.
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Trees in the direct path of the tornado were reduced to debarked stumps. Even low lying shrubbery was pulled up from the ground.
5534493ea407d.image.jpg


Vehicle damage collection
5374dce7235f3.image.jpg

5eb1b92ecac73.image.jpg

553541f02a637.image.jpg
 

csx1985

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Hate to just fill up this thread with purely Greensburg stuff but I came across another remarkable damage feat from this tornado.
View attachment 15019
Along Kansas Avenue a large brick reinforced building that was especially well built (visible at right) was utterly obliterated, and a section was completely leveled to the ground. Homes nearby were completely destroyed as well, many swept cleanly away.
View attachment 15020
View attachment 15021
Here’s the front portion and an aerial showing the back section of the building. The contextual damage in this area was extremely intense, several trees were completely debarked and shrubs were stripped bare as well.
View attachment 15022
View attachment 15023
View attachment 15024
These photos again show just how remarkably intense the tree and contextual damage was in this residential area. Debris granulation is evident as well, several homes once stood along this block. The second and last photo are incredible.
View attachment 15025
This image is looking north, the only standing section of the brick building is visible to the left of the tree in center. Note the completely debarked trees nearby.
View attachment 15026
The foundations of swept away homes are visible in this image and a section of the brick building is visible in the right corner of the photo.
View attachment 15029
This is one of the more extreme instances of damage I’ve come across from this tornado which also occurred in the area mentioned above. According to the person who took this photo, this home was swept cleanly away and the front concrete porch and steps (visible at right) were snapped off and deflected upward.
View attachment 15030
This fire hydrant that was pulled out of the ground was also located just behind the brick building that was leveled.

It’s pretty clear the tornado was also at EF5 intensity in this area and once more this is some of the most impressive tornado damage to a well constructed brick building I’ve seen. These images really show this tornado is among the most powerful recorded since the 2000’s, and further solidifies its EF5 rating.
Does anyone have the pictures of the fire hydrants from Smithville?
 

Western_KS_Wx

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Here’s something interesting I found about the tornadoes that occurred in the Greensburg-Trousdale-Macksville area during a 1 year period from May 2007-May 2008.
The area received 34 tornadoes, 21 in 2007 and 13 in 2008. Of those 34 tornadoes, 4 were rated EF2, 5 EF3, and 1 EF5. Now what makes this area notable is how enormous these tornadoes were, SEVEN of them greater than 1 mile in width. These are the tornadoes ranked in order from largest to smallest:

1. 2.2(+) miles Trousdale EF3(+) May 4, 2007
2. 1.8 miles Clark State Lake EF3(+) May 23, 2008
3. 1.7(+) miles Greensburg EF5 May 4, 2007
4. 1.35 miles Hopewell #1 EF3(+) May 4, 2007
5. 1.25 miles Hopewell #2 EF3 May 23, 2008
6. 1.05 miles Macksville EF3 May 4, 2007
7. 1.05 miles S Greensburg EF2 May 23, 2008
(Path widths based off measurable distance from NWS damage paths and official data, as well as aerial imagery)

Im not sure what it is about this particular region that makes it so prone to violent, massive tornadoes 3 of which wide enough to make the top 10 largest in recorded history list, and are the 3 largest in Kansas history. Also of note, on April 14, 2012 two more notable tornadoes occurred within this region both rated EF3. One was 1 mile wide, and the other was 1.5 miles wide, bringing the total to 9 mile wide tornadoes since 2007.
 
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Decided to do some digging to see if I could find more damage photos from Greensburg to add to this photo album I’m making for the event, and I came across some truly insane damage photos that again show just how powerful this tornado was.
View attachment 15010
This is the Greensburg Mennonite Church, a large brick building located in northern sections of the city pictured in 2005.
View attachment 15011
View attachment 15012
View attachment 15013
View attachment 15014
And this is what remained of it after the tornado completely flattened and largely swept it away. The damage to the church is among the most impressive I’ve seen, and it’s pretty clear the tornado was at EF5 strength here. The tree damage in this area was extreme to say the least, every tree and shrub near this location was completely stripped and debarked entirely.
View attachment 15016
This photo was taken near the church looking west. There were several homes that lined the street to the right and left that were completely swept away.
View attachment 15017
View attachment 15018
More instances of probable EF5 damage in northern sections of the city. In the first photo to the left of the white car there was a row of homes that all but vanished. In the second photo the foundation of a swept away home is visible to the left of the blue tent.
The damage to the church reminds me of what happened to the large brick schoolhouse in Udall; it's pretty clear that Greensburg was a tornado that reached Udall-levels of intensity but was weakening while passing through a town. Thankfully it wasn't at full intensity...
 

CalebRoutt

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Some areas of Moore '13 were legitimately on par with Jarrell or Bridge Creek, which is quite literally as bad as it gets.

Speaking of the 2013 outbreak sequence, I've got these saved as the Bethel Acres/Shawnee EF4 from the previous day, but I haven't really done much digging on that yet so I'm not 100% sure. Wish I'd remembered to note where they came from so I could check.

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This is damage somewhat on par with Moore! Wow!
 

CalebRoutt

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I will reiterate, as it's a common lament after the old TW went down, thanks to fortuitous obsessive digital hoarding I have both the old Significant Tornado Events and Strongest Tornado threads from the old site through about May 2014, perfectly intact with all posts and images through then (along with a few others such as the Joplin and May 2013 Moore/El Reno days) so if there's anything anyone wants me to pull from those I can do so. I'd repost them all here but would of course want explicit moderator approval before spamming the board.
Could you DM all damage photos from the Shawnee/Carney ok tornadoes in 2013?
 

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This is damage somewhat on par with Moore! Wow!
Yeah, that's actually one of the reasons I'd originally considered that outbreak for my next article. I was really surprised to learn just how violent the Shawnee EF4 was. IIRC the high-end damage only covered a smallish area around Bethel Acres and the Shawnee Reservoir, at least as far as I know, but it was pretty impressive.
 

CalebRoutt

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Yeah, that's actually one of the reasons I'd originally considered that outbreak for my next article. I was really surprised to learn just how violent the Shawnee EF4 was. IIRC the high-end damage only covered a smallish area around Bethel Acres and the Shawnee Reservoir, at least as far as I know, but it was pretty impressive.
Really? I was considering doing the same thing! I’ve got RaxPol data of it and at several points Shawnee had winds of ≥110 m/s (around or greater than 250 mph). Keep in mind some of this velocity data is noisy, but there were common peaks of around that for several lowest level scans within ~50m of the surface. Seeing the extreme damage to vegetation and vehicles, in addition to complete obliteration of mobile homes, with frames wrapped around debarked trees definitely points me to believe this tornado contained EF5 winds. However due to a lack of quality DI’s the max estimated winds were 190 mph based on damage. Had that tornado hit Shawnee head on, I most certainly think we would’ve seen damage at least on par with Moore.
 

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locomusic01

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If I can ever actually make time to work on some video stuff, would you guys prefer sort of a documentary-ish approach or more of a casual discussion? By which I guess I mean like a tightly scripted narrative vs. a free-flowing exploration that follows the general course of events but maybe takes the scenic route along the way. (I'm fully aware that I should never be encouraged to take the scenic route.)

I might play around with both to see what works, but I'm curious what kind of content y'all prefer.
 
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If I can ever actually make time to work on some video stuff, would you guys prefer sort of a documentary-ish approach or more of a casual discussion? By which I guess I mean like a tightly scripted narrative vs. a free-flowing exploration that follows the general course of events but maybe takes the scenic route along the way. (I'm fully aware that I should never be encouraged to take the scenic route.)

I might play around with both to see what works, but I'm curious what kind of content y'all prefer.
Documentary all the way.
 

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