Severe WX April 29-May 2nd, 2022 Severe Weather Threat (2 Viewers)

Equus

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Line south of the tornado warning going outflow dominant with the gust front well ahead, but that new tornado warned segment replacing the old supercell still has good surface based inflow for now
 

Equus

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Guess what, Fort Smith has another isolated supercell wrapping up, didn't expect Fort Smith to have the most vigorous supercells of the day, more than once, but here we are
 

buckeye05

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One tiny ornamental tree being debarked is not a solid basis for EF4. Not even close, especially considering it’s right next to a building that sustained only marginal EF3.

The only other tree damage-based EF4s I know of (GSMNP and Dayton) flattened huge swaths of woodland and completely debarked massive old-growth hardwoods.

Plus, if you go in with the mindset of trying to justify EF4 instead of being objective, you’ll find a way to convince yourself even if there’s no solid evidence.
 
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pohnpei

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One tiny ornamental tree being debarked is not a solid basis for EF4. Not even close, especially considering it’s right next to a building that sustained only marginal EF3.

The only other tree damage-based EF4s I know of (GSMNP and Dayton) flattened huge swaths of woodland and completely debarked massive old-growth hardwoods.

Plus, if you go in with the mindset of trying to justify EF4 instead of being objective, you’ll find a way to convince yourself even if there’s no solid evidence.
There's no doubt that this types of tree damage can't be used as reason to upgrade. But I am a little curious about did Dayton really completely debark massive old-growth hardwood?

The standard of EF4 tree damage rating sometimes varied. Tornados like Rochelle/Cookeville/Beauregard/Walthall Co had EF4 tree damage point without any major debarking. With completely debark massive old-growth hardwood like El Reno 11/Stanton/Pilger, they didn't have EF4 tree damage point.

And certainly, there's a difference between EF4 tree damage rating point and average tree damage level of tornados with violent construction damage. Seemingly, the former should be more strict.
 

buckeye05

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There's no doubt that this types of tree damage can't be used as reason to upgrade. But I am a little curious about did Dayton really completely debark massive old-growth hardwood?

The standard of EF4 tree damage rating sometimes varied. Tornados like Rochelle/Cookeville/Beauregard/Walthall Co had EF4 tree damage point without any major debarking. With completely debark massive old-growth hardwood like El Reno 11/Stanton/Pilger, they didn't have EF4 tree damage point.

And certainly, there's a difference between EF4 tree damage rating point and average tree damage level of tornados with violent construction damage. Seemingly, the former should be more strict.
Yes, in a relatively small area along a river behind an apartment complex in West Dayton, among a huge swath of flattened trees. There was no other tree damage like it along the path except for in this one spot. Unfortunately, since NWS Wilmington doesn't take survey photos anymore, pretty much no documentation of it exists, and that really annoys me. I did drive over there and looked for myself and can confirm. It was by far the most violent tree damage I have seen in person. The closest thing I can get to documentation is this single photo of some of the huge trees that were debarked behind the apartment building. There were some more huge trees stripped clean along the river bank, to the right just out of frame of the photo below. Anyway, sorry for derailing the thread, but this photo is worth sharing.

Part of me wonders if this small area of extreme tree damage was caused by a violent sub-vortex within the tornado, or maybe by the wind accelerating as it funneled through the small river valley in the area, via Bernoulli effect, but idk if the geographic influence here was significant enough to have that effect.
QTFtYJJ.jpg
 
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