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Strongest tornadoes on record (1 Viewer)

Ilka

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Hi, everybody.
My name is Ilya (Илья), I'm from Krasnoyarsk, Siberia (which is in Russia) and I'm obsessed with twisters. The first time I saw a tornado on TV I knew it was a love at first sight. I was 10 yo or so. Than was 1996 Twister movie...
Unfortunately, Russia and Siberia especially is not a tornado country. The most impressive thing for me was a supercell couple years ago, one and only on my memory. So... I do what I call "couch stormchasing" and dreaming of real stormchasing tour on Plains someday.
I've raead a lot of articles about US tornadoes, seen lot of pictures and videos. So these are my top... strongest tornadoes as I see it from the other side of the globe.

1. Jarrell, TX.
This twister completely blew my mind. Althou it occured pretty long ago, I've learned about it relatively recently. Pictures of total destruction, eyewitness accounts and articles of specialists made an indelible impression on me. I never thought that the wind is capable of doing such vicious but at the same time bewithching things. I am very sorry for all those people, who lost their lives in Jarrell nightmare, but I can't stop thinking of that tornado as a wonder of nature.
bumper-of-car.jpg


2. Moore, OK, 1999.
This record-breaking twister was my "favourite" before Jarrell. Especially because of this picture
article-2328040-19E67509000005DC-906_634x457.jpg

"What?! No way!" - that was the thirst thing on my mind when I saw it. When I've learned about "highest wind speed ever", I've done some primitive math. I knew that wind force and wind speed are in quadratic dependence. So if 50 m/s wind is capable of making an avarage person airborn, than 500 kph wind can make fly a "person" made of steel! That's so impressive! And of course that "F6" thing also plays a role.

3. El-Reno, OK, 2013
The second highes mesured wind speed. The widest tornado ever recorded. Professinal stormchasers died. That means something. What if this twister occured not in rural area? Aftermath could be horrible.

PS sorry for my english, I could have been expressed my thoughts better if I spoke russian )
 

warneagle

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Ilya, it would be incredible if you could say something about the 1984 Soviet Union outbreak. It has an almost mythical status in the U.S. because the information that's available in the West about it is pretty minimal, for obvious reasons. If you have some knowledge of it that's based on Russian sources that haven't been translated into English or anything like that I'm sure I can speak for all of us and say that we'd love to hear it.

I've always wanted to learn Russian, but Spanish, German, and Romanian in school got in the way and if I try anything else it's probably going to be Polish for work reasons.
 
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Hi, everybody.
My name is Ilya (Илья), I'm from Krasnoyarsk, Siberia (which is in Russia) and I'm obsessed with twisters. The first time I saw a tornado on TV I knew it was a love at first sight. I was 10 yo or so. Than was 1996 Twister movie...
Unfortunately, Russia and Siberia especially is not a tornado country. The most impressive thing for me was a supercell couple years ago, one and only on my memory. So... I do what I call "couch stormchasing" and dreaming of real stormchasing tour on Plains someday.
I've raead a lot of articles about US tornadoes, seen lot of pictures and videos. So these are my top... strongest tornadoes as I see it from the other side of the globe.

1. Jarrell, TX.
This twister completely blew my mind. Althou it occured pretty long ago, I've learned about it relatively recently. Pictures of total destruction, eyewitness accounts and articles of specialists made an indelible impression on me. I never thought that the wind is capable of doing such vicious but at the same time bewithching things. I am very sorry for all those people, who lost their lives in Jarrell nightmare, but I can't stop thinking of that tornado as a wonder of nature.
bumper-of-car.jpg


2. Moore, OK, 1999.
This record-breaking twister was my "favourite" before Jarrell. Especially because of this picture
article-2328040-19E67509000005DC-906_634x457.jpg

"What?! No way!" - that was the thirst thing on my mind when I saw it. When I've learned about "highest wind speed ever", I've done some primitive math. I knew that wind force and wind speed are in quadratic dependence. So if 50 m/s wind is capable of making an avarage person airborn, than 500 kph wind can make fly a "person" made of steel! That's so impressive! And of course that "F6" thing also plays a role.

3. El-Reno, OK, 2013
The second highes mesured wind speed. The widest tornado ever recorded. Professinal stormchasers died. That means something. What if this twister occured not in rural area? Aftermath could be horrible.

PS sorry for my english, I could have been expressed my thoughts better if I spoke russian )
 
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Probably not a good idea to use recorded wind speeds as a barometer since it very rare to get lucky enough to have Doppler radar nearby. Chances are good that a lot of tornadoes may have had as high or higher wind speeds but no radar nearby to measure it.

As warneagle said, it would be cool if you could post some pictures involving the 1984 outbreak in Russia.
 

DDM

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I think it's a real interesting discussion that could be rehashed over and over because there are so many different ways of looking at it. Since no two tornadoes are created equal, it's hard to for me to call the tornado that did the most damage the strongest. In all likelihood, the tornado with the most damaging potential probably took place over a field somewhere.

I've still never seen a tornado more intimidating than Andover. The motion was just incredible at times. It almost looked to be rotating at a 45 degree angle. Jarrell and Tuscaloosa were quite similar in their appearance.


Starting at about 4 minutes in is some of the most frightening tornado footage I've ever seen. The zoom in on the houses with the tornado appearing almost on top of it (in likelihood a good distance away) is enough to give me chills.

However, the damage was much less severe than a number of other F/EF5s. It produced some incredible wind rowing, but most of the tornado's peak damage took place over a mobile home park, which aren't exactly known for their superior construction.

1991wichita19065

1991wichita29076

If we're talking straight up damage, it's Jarrell for me hands down. "Wiped off the face of the Earth" comes to mind. Everything came together perfectly to create a tornado that was virtually unsurvivable above ground. The size of the tornado, the slow forward speed, the peak strength right over the town... it's just a worst case scenario.

One that I feel is pretty underrated is Parkersburg. I recall a basement wall being partially collapsed and there are some pictures out there of really finely granulated debris.

Hackleburg is the most impressive to me in terms of sustained damage. It was on the ground for a long time and produced high end damage over a large area.
 
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WIL9287

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Another tornado which doesn't get a lot of attention but was extremely violent (probably on the level of Bridge Creek) was the 5/31/1985 Niles/Wheatland tornado, which swept away large two-story, anchor-bolted houses, leveled a shopping center and truck plant, twisted steel girders like wet noodles and pushed them off the foundations, tossed 75,000 gallon oil tanks hundreds of feet and left many of them crushed and crumpled, scoured pavement from a parking lot, and wedged sections of sheet metal roofing and receipts beneath the edges of the scoured sections.


I have the book called "Tornado Watch 211" if I remember correctly (left the book at home, and I'm away at school), In Wheatland one body was torn apart, and another person was de-scalped "so deeply" that the person didn't even bleed. That is another example that shows that this was very violent. Only a few other violent tornadoes have "torn apart" people, the couple that come to my mind are Jarrell and Hackelburg. Also in “Significant Tornadoes” Grazulis called the Niles/Wheatland tornado a “maxi-tornado” and only a few other tornadoes such Andover and Moore (1999) have been called “maxi-tornadoes” by Grazulis.
 
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Also in “Significant Tornadoes” Grazulis called the Niles/Wheatland tornado a “maxi-tornado” and only a few other tornadoes such Andover and Moore (1999) have been called “maxi-tornadoes” by Grazulis.
Do you mind citing the sources for Andover and Moore being called “maxi-tornadoes” as well? I have both volumes of Significant Tornadoes (vol. I from 1680–1991, vol. II from 1992–1995) as well as The Tornado, and I have also viewed the F5-F6 supplement, and nowhere in any of these did I find a tornado other than Wheatland being referred to as a “maxi-tornado.” Where does Thomas P. Grazulis refer to Andover and/or Moore as “maxi-tornadoes” as well? Thank you in advance!
 

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