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Significant Earthquake and Tsunami Events

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In the SigTor thread I made a couple posts pondering over what could be the oldest photo of tornado damage (NOT the oldest photo of an actual tornado) and so far the oldest photo I've come across is of a destroyed bridge from the 1874 Lewistown tornado.

But that of course got me thinking about what could be the oldest photo of earthquake damage, and so far, these photos from the 1857 Basilicata earthquake seem to be the oldest:
1280px-Mallet_pertosa.jpg

Terremoto-Basilicata-1857-DUo.jpg

General-view-of-Potenza-after-the-1857-seismic-event-according-to-the-Mallets-report.png

30399af33c864850ae3f6bcf22355afe.webp


As for tsunami damage, the oldest ones I've found so far are from the 1868 Arica (Peru, now Chile) tsunami:
1024px-Arica_after_the_earthquake_%281868%29.JPG

USS_Wateree_%281863%29.jpg
I wonder what's the earliest photo of a tsunami waves?
 

TH2002

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I wonder what's the earliest photo of a tsunami waves?
So far, the earliest I've found of an actual wave are from the 1946 Hawaii tsunami. I have a feeling there's something older out there, haven't had much time to look though.
Tsunami_large.jpg

1998.004.0001.jpg


This last photo is particularly crazy; the man seen here was among the fatalities:
fZD5QETMKg8hgN7XyZwf3M.jpg


A few more here: https://earthweb.ess.washington.edu/tsunami/general/historic/images_46.html

Footage of the thing, possibly the earliest tsunami footage:
 

TH2002

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Today is the anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, which remains the deadliest natural disaster of the 21st century. In terms of fatalities, Indonesia was by far the hardest hit, with over 130,000 people killed there alone. But the effects of this disaster were far-reaching...

In The Maldives, at least 82 people were killed and damages were equivalent to 62% of the country's entire GDP. Due to the unique presence of phytoplankton in the Maldives' water, the tsunami took on an extraordinarily rare, almost "clear water" appearance.


This video is a true nightmare scenario. The only way to get to this resort is by boat. Nowhere to run and nothing you can do but pray that the entire building doesn't come down...


In Malaysia, where at least 62 died, the tsunami took on a polar-opposite, but more typical muddy appearance. Along Gurney Drive in Penang, traffic chaos ensued as drivers attempted to escape the rushing water:


The worst of the tsunami's impacts in Penang were along its beaches, where many picnickers and holiday-makers were caught off guard by the wave. This was much akin to the unfortunate scenario that played out in other hard-hit locations, where many people didn't realize what they were looking at until it was already too late and the tsunami was virtually on top of them. Hopefully, the lessons learned from this tragedy will continue to be used to increase tsunami preparedness and decrease future tsunami death tolls worldwide.
 

locomusic01

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Today is the anniversary of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami, which remains the deadliest natural disaster of the 21st century. In terms of fatalities, Indonesia was by far the hardest hit, with over 130,000 people killed there alone. But the effects of this disaster were far-reaching...
As horrific as tornadoes and other disasters are, I've always found tsunamis to be particularly terrifying. One time years ago we had major flooding in my area and a large beaver dam upstream from us broke in the middle of the night. I woke up suddenly to the sound of water rushing past just outside my bedroom wall and found that the normally small creek a hundred yards away had literally surrounded my house up to the bottoms of the windows. My neighbor's younger kids were home alone that night and the power had gone out so I had to wade through the water to go check on them.

It was nothing even remotely comparable to a tsunami, obviously, but that night gave me an all new appreciation for how frightening and unstoppable water can be. Especially when dawn arrived and I could see campers and pieces of debris from a campground up the road floating down through our yard (they weren't occupied at the time thankfully). I can't begin to imagine what it must have been like for the people impacted by this event, or any major tsunami for that matter.
 
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