Odd Tornado Damage (1 Viewer)

Kevinoz10

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I do have a few questions on violent tornadoes, is how granulation happens (I assume just from the high winds just pulverizing debris) as well as how windrowing occurs (I would assume due to sub vortexes)


Also I would love to see any odd photos of tornado damage any of you may have, I'm always in awe of what they can do
 

buckeye05

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I thought this was sort of interesting. It's from the recent tri-state EF4 in Leachville, AR. Only one tree in a row of pine trees has been debarked, and it's probably no coincidence that it appears to be the only tree wrapped in sheet metal. The sheet metal probably acted like a potato peeler to that tree. This is among the most severe debarking I've seen next to a building that still has walls standing.
LeachvilleDebarking.PNG
 
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Kevinoz10

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I thought this was sort of interesting. It's from the recent tri-state EF4 in Leachville, AR. Only one tree in a row pine trees has been debarked, and it's probably no coincidence that it appears to be the only tree wrapped in sheet metal. The sheet metal probably acted like a potato peeler to the trees. This is among the most severe debarking I've seen next to a building that still has walls standing.
View attachment 11788
That is amazing that it debarked the one tree, and left the rest alone and didn't destroy the building in the process
 
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You'll find a lot of photos of odd/extreme high-end damage in this thread:

 

pohnpei

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I thought this was sort of interesting. It's from the recent tri-state EF4 in Leachville, AR. Only one tree in a row of pine trees has been debarked, and it's probably no coincidence that it appears to be the only tree wrapped in sheet metal. The sheet metal probably acted like a potato peeler to the trees. This is among the most severe debarking I've seen next to a building that still has walls standing.
View attachment 11788
Similar to this from Hattisburg 2013. One almost fully debarked trees near EF1 damage
1641995193642.jpg
 

pohnpei

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One children's play set was left almost untoched in Joplin. For a comparsion, the same type of thing almost got pulled out in Pilger.
FCVMkpQUcAArFDh.jpeg
school-before.jpg school-after.jpg
 

locomusic01

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I do have a few questions on violent tornadoes, is how granulation happens (I assume just from the high winds just pulverizing debris) as well as how windrowing occurs (I would assume due to sub vortexes)

Also I would love to see any odd photos of tornado damage any of you may have, I'm always in awe of what they can do
Yeah, debris granulation is pretty much just stuff gettin' smashed up real good. The debris itself can also add to the tornado's destructive force, so it's a bit of a feedback loop at a certain point - ground-up debris gets entrained into the tornado, which smashes up more stuff, which creates more debris, etc.

Regarding windrowing, it can be associated with subvortices but isn't always. Basically what happens is that there's a part of the vortex called the corner flow region, which is where the horizontal/radial inflow abruptly shoots vertically into the updraft. If the winds in this corner flow region are really intense, they sort of collect the debris that's being generated and deposit it in convergent streaks. The same thing can happen w/subvortices as well, just on a smaller scale and in multiple streaks.
 

buckeye05

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Similar to this from Hattisburg 2013. One almost fully debarked trees near EF1 damage
View attachment 11831
Yeah. It is worth mentioning that in both cases, these were softwoods/pine trees, which seem to be much more prone to debarking. While severe debarking is usually a very reliable indicator of a violent tornado, I have learned to ignore cases where one single tree is debarked but surrounded by many others that aren't. It usually suggests a defect or extensive debris impacts to that one particular tree.
 

Kevinoz10

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Yeah, debris granulation is pretty much just stuff gettin' smashed up real good. The debris itself can also add to the tornado's destructive force, so it's a bit of a feedback loop at a certain point - ground-up debris gets entrained into the tornado, which smashes up more stuff, which creates more debris, etc.

Regarding windrowing, it can be associated with subvortices but isn't always. Basically what happens is that there's a part of the vortex called the corner flow region, which is where the horizontal/radial inflow abruptly shoots vertically into the updraft. If the winds in this corner flow region are really intense, they sort of collect the debris that's being generated and deposit it in convergent streaks. The same thing can happen w/subvortices as well, just on a smaller scale and in multiple streaks.
Thank you a ton on that information! I'm still trying to learn as much as I can about tornadoes. I know the very basics, but I'm starting to get more in depth with them, the December outback really got me re-interested in them
 

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