Severe WX January 11, 2020 Severe Weather Reports and Nowcasts (2 Viewers)


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388
Location
Madison, WI
Really surprised this thing hasn't run out of gas yet as it outpaces the instability and upper support lifts NE away from the area. Nearly solid SVR warnings from the KY-VA/TN line to the Gulf Coast.
 

Kory

Member
Messages
3,792
Location
Tuscaloosa, Alabama
Prelim EF-2 but still surveying in Pickens County. I bet we get it up to EF-3 just given the damage video and comments from Brett Adair about how destructive the aftermath was.
 

RollTide18

Member
Messages
57
Location
Montgomery, AL
So two strong tornadoes in Alabama and several more being surveyed. I don’t wanna hear about storm mode mitigating a threat yet again. QLCS can pose a strong tornado threat. And I think we learned not to take models instability at face value.
That was probably the most impressive (not in a happy positive way) winter severe events I've ever witnessed. Can you think of a winter severe event like this?
 

Gawxnative

Member
Messages
28
Location
Between, Georgia (Walton County)
That was probably the most impressive (not in a happy positive way) winter severe events I've ever witnessed. Can you think of a winter severe event like this?
Jan 9-11, 1975 :
Tornado summary event[edit]

Damage from an F3 tornado in St. Clair County, Alabama
An unusual feature of this outbreak was that daytime heating, typically a key ingredient in the formation of tornadoes, had very little impact on their development.[3] Rather, as the storm system pulled out into the central plains, strong thunderstorms and tornadoes quickly began to form despite the late hours. The first two tornadoes in the outbreak touched down after 10:00 p.m. CST on January 9 in Oklahoma and Louisiana. From there the progression of the twisters shifted eastward through the overnight and early morning hours, setting the stage for what would turn out to be a record-setting day on January 10. Texas saw five tornadoes between 1:30 a.m.–3:30 a.m., one tornado touched down in Arkansas at 6:00 a.m., Louisiana saw seven tornadoes between 5:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. (killing one person), Mississippi had five tornadoes between 8:15 a.m.–10:00 a.m. (killing nine), and Illinois and Indiana each experienced three lunch-hour tornadoes. The tornadic line of storms then shifted into Alabama (killing one) and Florida during the afternoon and evening hours.[4]

Outbreak death toll
StateTotalCountyCounty
total
Alabama1St. Clair1
Florida1Bay1
Louisiana1Acadia1
Mississippi9Lincoln5
Pike4
Totals12
All deaths were tornado-related​
Mississippi and Alabama were the two states hardest hit by this outbreak. Alabama saw the most twisters of any state with 13, but Mississippi saw the largest and deadliest tornado. An F4 tornado that tore through Pike, Lincoln, Lawrence, and Simpson Counties at 8:14 a.m. killed nine people and injured over 200; severely damaging 38 blocks in the town of McComb. The 39 tornadoes that touched down on January 10 marked the most active tornadic day in January in U.S. history at that time.[5] The 52 tornadoes that touched down during January 1975 also set a U.S. record for the most tornadoes during that month. Both of these records were eventually broken in January 1999.[6]

After a calm day on January 11, four more tornadoes touched down in Florida and Georgia on January 12, killing one person in Florida. By the time the outbreak was done it had produced 45 tornadoes, killed 12 people, injured 377 and caused $42 million in damages.[4]

Confirmed tornadoes
 

Gawxnative

Member
Messages
28
Location
Between, Georgia (Walton County)
Jan 9-11, 1975 :
Tornado summary event[edit]

Damage from an F3 tornado in St. Clair County, Alabama
An unusual feature of this outbreak was that daytime heating, typically a key ingredient in the formation of tornadoes, had very little impact on their development.[3] Rather, as the storm system pulled out into the central plains, strong thunderstorms and tornadoes quickly began to form despite the late hours. The first two tornadoes in the outbreak touched down after 10:00 p.m. CST on January 9 in Oklahoma and Louisiana. From there the progression of the twisters shifted eastward through the overnight and early morning hours, setting the stage for what would turn out to be a record-setting day on January 10. Texas saw five tornadoes between 1:30 a.m.–3:30 a.m., one tornado touched down in Arkansas at 6:00 a.m., Louisiana saw seven tornadoes between 5:30 a.m.–8:00 a.m. (killing one person), Mississippi had five tornadoes between 8:15 a.m.–10:00 a.m. (killing nine), and Illinois and Indiana each experienced three lunch-hour tornadoes. The tornadic line of storms then shifted into Alabama (killing one) and Florida during the afternoon and evening hours.[4]

Outbreak death toll
StateTotalCountyCounty
total
Alabama1St. Clair1
Florida1Bay1
Louisiana1Acadia1
Mississippi9Lincoln5
Pike4
Totals12
All deaths were tornado-related​
Mississippi and Alabama were the two states hardest hit by this outbreak. Alabama saw the most twisters of any state with 13, but Mississippi saw the largest and deadliest tornado. An F4 tornado that tore through Pike, Lincoln, Lawrence, and Simpson Counties at 8:14 a.m. killed nine people and injured over 200; severely damaging 38 blocks in the town of McComb. The 39 tornadoes that touched down on January 10 marked the most active tornadic day in January in U.S. history at that time.[5] The 52 tornadoes that touched down during January 1975 also set a U.S. record for the most tornadoes during that month. Both of these records were eventually broken in January 1999.[6]

After a calm day on January 11, four more tornadoes touched down in Florida and Georgia on January 12, killing one person in Florida. By the time the outbreak was done it had produced 45 tornadoes, killed 12 people, injured 377 and caused $42 million in damages.[4]

Confirmed tornadoes
I was "working" as an intern at WSB Tv then, and the QLCS was very impressive. (back then they had just gotten the "civilian" version of WSR-74 at the station, and in working it several tops exceeded 50k and we could "see" the line west of BHM. This event was much more tornadic than yesterdays, and a bit less on the QLCS side, with several discrete cells ahead of the QLCS in MS and AL. Mostly pure QLCS in GA
 

Equus

Member
Messages
1,358
Location
Saragossa, AL
A strong EF2 was confirmed in SC as well. So yesterday had 653 preliminary wind reports so far, at least three strong tornadoes, and multiple fatalities. Absolutely a day to remember.
 

ARCC

Member
Messages
405
Location
Coosa county
That was probably the most impressive (not in a happy positive way) winter severe events I've ever witnessed. Can you think of a winter severe event like this?
The east AL February Derecho of 2008 comes to mind. Not as wide an area, but 80-100mph winds and a few tornadoes with one being an EF3 in GA. That one come out of no where.

Edit: Still to this day, possibly the most freaked out I’ve been in a weather event. Didn’t help much to awake to the worst lightning I’ve ever seen before they sent the message to do a nighttime thunderstorm warning siren.

 
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