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Unluckiest Towns/Cities for Tornadoes (2 Viewers)

What are the unluckiest towns/cities for tornado activity? (can select two responses)

  • Oklahoma City/Moore, OK

    Votes: 12 70.6%
  • Tuscaloosa, AL

    Votes: 8 47.1%
  • El Reno, OK

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Codell, KS

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Tanner, AL

    Votes: 5 29.4%
  • Wichita Falls, TX

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Murfreesboro, TN

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Jonesboro, AR

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Jackson, TN

    Votes: 1 5.9%
  • Other

    Votes: 1 5.9%

  • Total voters
    17

TH2002

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Well you have to keep in mind that most people aren't able to recognize damage above the EF3 threshold; EF4 and EF5 damage are often so extreme most people don't realize what they're looking at, especially if an EF5 swept away a large building; if you're not from the area you likely wouldn't recognize anything was amiss unless you closely went up and examined the foundation; it's unlikely news crews have enough time to fully document damage like that, plus it's not their jobs; that's the damage survey teams' job.
I could understand if the EF5 damage was easily missable and I know it is the survey teams' responsibility to perform a close inspection of the damage, but it is still annoying when (a) the NWS nukes a lot of their old, useful resources, and not a single other cameraman bothered to document the EF5 damage, or (b) NEITHER a news crew nor the survey team bothered to take any pictures of the violent damage. For good reason it is important for a damage point to be documented by more than just one reliable source, and to have actual visual documentation in the first place, but that goes without saying.
 

buckeye05

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My local WFO stopped posting damage pictures or using the DAT altogether a few years ago. It’s all text only now. What’s even more irritating is that they do take survey photos, but you can only find them on NWS Wilmington damage surveyor Andy Hatzos’ Twitter page, and only if he is the one surveying and chooses to post to Twitter.
 

TH2002

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My local WFO stopped posting damage pictures or using the DAT altogether a few years ago. It’s all text only now. What’s even more irritating is that they do take survey photos, but you can only find them on NWS Wilmington damage surveyor Andy Hatzos’ Twitter page, and only if he is the one surveying and chooses to post to Twitter.
Is there any legitimate reason for NWS Wilmington making that decision or was it pretty much just "screw you guys, we're going backwards"?
 

TH2002

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Daisy Hill, Indiana was hit by an F5 during the '74 Super Outbreak and hit again by the Henryville EF4 in 2012. The community was also hit by additional tornadoes in 1985 and 2004.
 

locomusic01

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Along with seemingly ignoring a lot of small towns altogether I am just so sick and tired of them deliberately ignoring more intense damage to document obviously weaker damage. It is crap like that that is one of the reasons why a lot of people unfairly question Joplin's EF5 rating; because almost no "reliable sources" bothered to document homes and other structures with EF5 damage. It is also no secret that almost all of them drove right past the EF5 damage outside of Greensburg. I don't have a problem with them wanting to document an area where numerous fatalities occurred, but at the same time violent damage should not be overlooked or ignored.
I don't think that's a problem with media so much as with people in general. I run into this problem all the time - people will describe likely violent-level damage, yet when I ask about photos they're very often focused on things that aren't particularly impressive from an intensity standpoint. It's the kind of thing that doesn't even occur to most people.
 
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I don't think that's a problem with media so much as with people in general. I run into this problem all the time - people will describe likely violent-level damage, yet when I ask about photos they're very often focused on things that aren't particularly impressive from an intensity standpoint. It's the kind of thing that doesn't even occur to most people.
Especially given stuff like ground scouring, low-lying vegetation stripping, tree debarking/denuding and empty slab foundations aren't exactly photogenic or the easiest to recognize from a distance; you really have to get out there and look for the clues.
 

catatonia

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