Tropical Storm Tropical Storm Florence

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59
Location
North Prattville, Al
Hey everyone,

I found a neat weather app great for TS/hurricane tracking. It has overlays that give you;

*Wind speed
*Wind Gusts
*Air Pressure
*Wind Wave Height
*Swell Wave Height
*Humidity

& more (temp, etc).

It is free for web applications (desktop/laptop) & a couple dollars for the smart phone app.

Go to:

www.ventusky.com

Note: I have no relationship with this company.

The wave heights are especially neat to me, though there may be other apps out there that give the same info.
 

WesL

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www.ventusky.com

Note: I have no relationship with this company.

The wave heights are especially neat to me, though there may be other apps out there that give the same info.
I really like this site! Thanks for suggesting it. Has a lot of good information and I'm a sucker for some cool animation.
 

South AL Wx

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Montgomery, AL
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100 mph on the 5 pm advisory:

Hurricane Florence Advisory Number 58
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL062018
500 PM EDT Thu Sep 13 2018

...HURRICANE-FORCE WINDS GETTING CLOSER TO THE NORTH CAROLINA OUTER
BANKS AND COASTAL SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA...
...LIFE-THREATENING STORM SURGE AND RAINFALL EXPECTED...


SUMMARY OF 500 PM EDT...2100 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...33.7N 76.2W
ABOUT 100 MI...160 KM ESE OF WILMINGTON NORTH CAROLINA
ABOUT 155 MI...250 KM E OF MYRTLE BEACH SOUTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...100 MPH...155 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...WNW OR 295 DEGREES AT 5 MPH...7 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...955 MB...28.20 INCHES
 
Messages
720
Location
McCalla, AL
@Evan I created an account just to say that your post really got me interested in observing the kinetic energy of hurricanes. I've been a long time weather enthusiast (have been a lurker of these forums for years!) and your last two posts have changed the way I look at hurricanes. I use to hang on to categories and wind speed as the end all/be all for these storms but now I'm seeing the importance of digging deeper. Thank you for your posts!
Hey, I'm glad to hear that you found the information useful. There's definitely been a trend towards looking at the potential kinetic energy of storms instead of being married to the Saffir-Simpson scale. I'm sure others have raised the topic before. What really got me interested in it was spending a lot of time in New Orleans/MS Gulf Coast YEARS after Katrina and seeing the massive impacts it had on that area. Katrina was a high-end Cat 3 at landfall, but she broke the record books for damage and deaths. Ike was another storm that demonstrated that a weakening hurricane can do a LOT more than we might think given its Saffir-Simpson rating.

I see it as a question of physics -- which is the underpinning of how we try to understand and predict weather in the first place. You have a certain amount of energy, and that energy has to be transferred somewhere by the storm. Frequently the wind damage pales in comparison to the storm surge. You can have two storms -- one with significantly higher wind in a tiny core -- and a second storm with a much larger area of wind even though it is less severe than the first storm. The first storm might be a Cat 4 whereas the other storm might be a moderate Cat 3, and the larger storm can do a great deal of damage over a larger area when it has much more kinetic energy. Charlie is a good contrasting example. Hellacious wind speeds just short of a Cat 5, but the storm surge was way less than typical for a storm of that intensity. Reason? The available kinetic energy was tiny compared to a Katrina or Ike. It's a different way of looking at things to be sure, but I think it has a lost of relevancy with Florence.
 
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Location
Mandeville, LA
cutting and pasting Cantore’s retweet: “Local Storm Report by NWS MHX: Atlantic Beach [Carteret Co, NC] public reports HEAVY RAIN of M12.73 INCH at 08:28 PM EDT -- measured by usgs rapid deployment gauge in atlantic beach.”
 

KoD

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Huntsville, AL
The eye is looking rather healthy on radar, idk if it's a result of being closer to the Doppler or just wrapping up neatly. My favorite product to view for hurricanes is the wind history and it's pretty menacing.
212226_wind_history.png
 

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