Hawaii Volcano Kilauea

JayF

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#2
M5.3 - ISLAND OF HAWAII, HAWAII
Preliminary Earthquake Report
Magnitude 5.3
Date-Time
  • 4 May 2018 21:32:44 UTC
  • 4 May 2018 11:32:44 near epicenter
  • 4 May 2018 15:32:44 standard time in your timezone
Location 19.340N 155.029W
Depth 6 km
Distances
  • 18 km (11 miles) SE (144 degrees) of Fern Forest, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SSE (155 degrees) of Eden Roc, HI
  • 19 km (12 miles) SW (217 degrees) of Leilani Estates, HI
  • 41 km (26 miles) S (172 degrees) of Hilo, HI
  • 365 km (227 miles) SE (126 degrees) of Honolulu, HI
Location Uncertainty Horizontal: 0.7 km; Vertical 0.6 km
Parameters Nph = 78; Dmin = 0.1 km; Rmss = 0.35 seconds; Gp = 197°
Version = 1
Event ID hv 70116411
For updates, maps, and technical information
see: Event Page or USGS Earthquake Hazards Program
Hawaii Volcano Observatory
U.S. Geological Survey

http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov
 

WesL

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#4
Seriously.. Listen to the audio. That is the stuff nightmares are made of.

 

gaikkeb

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#5
Beautiful yet devastating. I want to live in Hawaii and had recently been looking at this area because it was close to Hilo and some decent jobs! I hope that people are safe and that they will receive the help they need once they are allowed to go back, especially if they have to rebuild.
 
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Corvallis, Oregon
#6
When I saw the first videos, it reminded me of storm chasers, but this is something more lasting than a tornado. In case anyone is interested, I'm doing a Kilauea update on my blog. Also, today's Sunday Morning Volcano was about Hawaii.

Three very good online resources for information:

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Kilauea update (best to subscribe to this by email; the page update was delayed earlier this week--by the big quake and resulting effects at the observatory, I'm guessing)

USGS updates page

Hawaii County CD alerts
 

WesL

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#7
Up to 26 structures and still on the move.
 
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Location
Corvallis, Oregon
#8
Per USGS/HVO, the eruption has paused (but gassing continues). Hawaii County CD says 104 acres of lava and 35 confirmed structures, including 26 homes.

[QUOTE="JayF, post: 17273, member: 1700 people evacuated.[/QUOTE]

Some followup on the human dimension--a community meeting held last night (h/t to Dr. Janine Krippner):




But as always in disasters, look for the helpers (there are donation links here, too).
 
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Corvallis, Oregon
#9
PS: Pele was apparently just catching her breath. Two more fissues in the last couple of hours (total 14 right now - max in the 1950s eruption was 24, I think), and more damage. :( m.hawaiinewsnow.com/hawaiinewsnow/db/330510/content/kt5hgCu8
 

JayF

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#10
HVO/USGS Volcanic Activity Notice

Volcano: Kilauea (VNUM #332010)

Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING

Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Issued: Wednesday, May 9, 2018, 8:02 AM HST
Source: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
Notice Number:
Location: N 19 deg 25 min W 155 deg 17 min
Elevation: 4091 ft (1247 m)
Area: Hawaii

Volcanic Activity Summary: The steady lowering of the lava lake in “Overlook crater” within Halemaʻumaʻu at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano has raised the potential for explosive eruptions in the coming weeks. If the lava column drops to the level of groundwater beneath Kīlauea Caldera, influx of water into the conduit could cause steam-driven explosions. Debris expelled during such explosions could impact the area surrounding Halemaʻumaʻu and the Kīlauea summit. At this time, we cannot say with certainty that explosive activity will occur, how large the explosions could be, or how long such explosive activity could continue.

Residents of the Kīlauea summit area should learn about the hazards of ashfall, stay informed of the status of the volcano and area closures, and review family and business emergency plans.

Resource on volcanic ash hazards: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/


Remarks: HAZARDS

Primary hazards of concern should this activity occur are ballistic projectiles and ashfall.

BALLISTIC PROJECTILES
During steam-driven explosions, ballistic blocks up to 2 m (yards) across could be thrown in all directions to a distance of 1 km (0.6 miles) or more. These blocks could weigh a few kilograms (pounds) to several tons.

Smaller (pebble-size) rocks could be sent several kilometers (miles) from Halemaʻumaʻu, mostly in a downwind direction.

ASHFALL
Presently, during the drawdown of the lava column, rockfalls from the steep enclosing walls of the Overlook crater vent impact the lake and produce small ash clouds. These clouds are very dilute and result in dustings of ash (particles smaller than 2 mm) downwind.

Should steam-driven explosions begin, ash clouds will rise to greater elevations above ground. Minor ashfall could occur over much wider areas, even up to several tens of miles from Halemaʻumaʻu. In 1924, ash may have reached as high as 20,000 feet above sea level. Small amounts of fine ash from these explosions fell over a wide area as far north as North Hilo (Hakalau), in lower Puna, and as far south as Waiohinu.

GAS
Gas emitted during steam-drive explosions will be mainly steam, but will include some sulfur dioxide (SO2) as well. Currently, SO2 emissions remain elevated.


WARNING TIME

Steam-driven explosions at volcanoes typically provide very little warning. Once the lava level reaches the groundwater elevation, onset of continuous ashy plumes or a sequence of violent steam-driven explosions may be the first sign that activity of concern has commenced.


BACKGROUND

Kīlauea’s lava lake began to drop on May 2, 2018. From its peak on May 2 to the most recent measurement at 9 pm on May 6, the lava lake surface dropped a total of more than 200 m (656 ft). The subsidence was at a relatively constant rate of about 2 meters (yards) per hour.

Measurements of subsidence have not been possible since May 6 because of thick fume and the increasing depth to the lava surface. However, thermal images indicate continued lowering of the lake surface since that time, consistent with deflationary tilt recorded at Kīlauea’s summit. Therefore, we infer that the lake surface continues to drop at roughly the same rate. So, while HVO cannot report exact depths of the receding lava lake, we can monitor the overall trend.

USGS and HVO scientists are monitoring changes at the summit 24/7 and watching for signs that hazardous conditions have increased, or may increase. HVO is working closely with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i County Civil Defense to respond to this situation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Updates on activity will be posted on the HVO website at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can receive these updates by email through a free subscription service: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

Hawai‘i County Civil Defense will issue its own hazard notices should that become necessary: http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park status is posted on their web page:
https://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm

Resources on volcanic ash can be found at:
https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/


Contacts: [email protected]

Next Notice: Daily updates on all volcanic activity at Kīlauea are issued each morning and posted on out website: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/status.html

You can sign up to receive these messages automatically by visiting https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is one of five volcano observatories within the U.S. Geological Survey and is responsible for monitoring volcanoes and earthquakes in Hawai`i.
 
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Location
Corvallis, Oregon
#13
USGS just tweeted this - it was "only" a rockfall. That water-lava interaction, if and when, it occurs, should be a doozy!


<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Rockfall generates a short-lived explosion at Halema‘uma‘u crater, Hawaii, at 8:27 a.m. HST, May 9. Explosion not caused by the interaction of the lava lake with the water table. <a href="https://t.co/hd8FPsBVgf">https://t.co/hd8FPsBVgf</a> <a href="https://t.co/pNUcJYep9y">pic.twitter.com/pNUcJYep9y</a></p>&mdash; USGS Volcanoes (@USGSVolcanoes) <a href="">May 9, 2018</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 

JayF

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#15
KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Lower East Rift Zone Eruption

Eruption of lava continues from the northeast end of the active fissure system. Residents in lower Puna should remain informed and heed Hawaii County Civil Defense closures, warnings, and messages (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts).

As of late today, activity was dominated by lava fountaining, explosion of spatter bombs hundreds of feet into the air, and several advancing lava flow lobes moving generally northeast from fissure 17 at the downrift (northeast) end of the new fissure system. As of about 7 pm, one lobe was 2 yards thick and advancing roughly parallel to Highway 132. The flow front was just over a half mile southeast of the intersection of Highway 132 and Noni Farms Road.

Based on overflight images late this afternoon, additional lava from fissure 17 was also moving slowly southeast. Volcanic gas emissions remain elevated.

For the most recent map showing the locations of activity, please see https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/multimedia_maps.html

HVO field crews are on site overnight tracking the lava flow as conditions allow and reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense.

This eruption is still evolving and additional outbreaks of lava are possible. The location of future outbreaks could include areas both uprift (southwest) and downrift (northeast) of the existing fissures, or, existing fissures can be reactivated. Communities downslope of these fissures could be at risk from lava inundation. Activity can change rapidly.

For information on volcanic air pollution, please see: http://www.ivhhn.org/vog/

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

Deflationary tilt continues. A robust plume of steam and volcanic gas, occasionally mixed with ash, has risen from the Overlook crater within Halemaumau. Over the course of the day, rockfalls from the steep walls enclosing the Overlook crater generated ash clouds mixed with steam and gas intermittently throughout the day. These ash clouds have been relatively low concentration and have risen at most only a few thousand feet above the ground, a few generating very localized ashfall downwind. More explosive activity generating larger ash clouds remains possible and can occur with no warning.

Earthquake activity in the summit remains elevated with several strongly felt events at HVO today. Most of these earthquakes are related to the ongoing subsidence of the summit area and earthquakes beneath the south flank of the volcano.

For information on volcanic ash, please see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/
 

JayF

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#16
The previous post was yesterdays update. Here is today's update.

KILAUEA VOLCANO
(VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

Ash emission from the Overlook crater within Halemaumau has generally increased this morning compared to previous days. Although varying in intensity, at times the plume contains enough ash to be gray in color. The cloud is rising an estimated 3 to 4,000 feet above the ground, but altitudes are varying with pulses of emission. The ash cloud is drifting generally west and southwest from the Kilauea summit and ashfall is occurring in the Ka'u Desert. Communities downwind are likely to receive ashfall today and should take necessary precautions.

The National Weather Service has issued a Special Weather Statement regarding ashfall, please see: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/hnl/

For information on the hazards of volcanic ash and how to prepare your home or business, please see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

Earthquake activity in the summit remains elevated with several strongly felt events at HVO today. Most of these earthquakes are related to the ongoing subsidence of the summit area and earthquakes beneath the south flank of the volcano.

For information on volcanic ash, please see: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

MORE INFORMATION

Activity Summary also available by phone: (808) 967-8862
 

JayF

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#18
Earthquakes are picking up around the Volcano. The situation is becoming more unstable. Latest update from HVO.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (VNUM #332010)
19°25'16" N 155°17'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: RED

KĪLAUEA INFORMATION STATEMENT

Strong earthquakes within the summit of Kīlauea Volcano continue in response to ongoing deflation and lava column drop. As of the afternoon of May 16, the floor of Kīlauea caldera has dropped approximately 3 feet (90 cm). This movement is stressing faults around the caldera of Kilauea, causing them to move and resulting in strong earthquakes of up to magnitude 4.4 thus far.

Employees at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and nearby residents are reporting frequent ground shaking and damage to roads and buildings. Hawaii County Police reports cracks across Highway 11 between mile markers 28 and 29. Although these are passable, motorists are urged to use caution.

As deflation continues, strong earthquakes in the area around Kilauea Volcano's summit are expected to continue and may become more frequent. Areas further from these earthquakes may feel some ground motion as well, but much less severe.

The shallow depths of these earthquakes make them more damaging in the immediate vicinity of the epicenter, and individuals need to take precautions to minimize damage from the shaking, including the removal of unstable items from walls and shelves. Steep slopes should be avoided as they may become destabilized during strong earthquakes.
 

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